Fall 2021

  • PSYC 110: Principles of Psychology

    This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment. 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Mitchell Campbell, Lawrence Wichlinski, Gisel Flores-Montoya, Julia Strand, Julie Neiworth
  • PSYC 210: Psychology of Learning and Memory

    A summary of theoretical approaches, historical influences and contemporary research in the area of human and animal learning. The course provides a background in classical, operant, and contemporary conditioning models, and these are applied to issues such as behavioral therapy, drug addiction, decision-making, education, and choice. It is recommended that students enroll concurrently in Psychology 211. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission 6 credits; Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Science with Lab; offered Fall 2021 · Julie Neiworth
  • PSYC 211: Laboratory Research Methods in Learning and Memory

    This course accompanies Psychology 210. Students will replicate classical studies and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human and animal learning and memory. Psychology 211 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 210. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission; Concurrent registration in Psychology 210 2 credits; Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Science with Lab, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Julie Neiworth
  • PSYC 238: Memory Processes

    Memory is involved in nearly every human activity: We use our memory not only when we reminisce about the past, but when we study for our exams, talk to our friends, and tie our shoes. This course explores the psychological science of human memory. We will examine different types of memory, how we encode new memories and retrieve old ones, how to ensure a memory is never forgotten, and how to implant a false memory in someone else. In doing so we will look at both old and new research, and discuss how memory research can be applied to some real world environments, such as courtrooms and classrooms. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the field of memory research and be able to evaluate the quality of the studies used as evidence in these debates.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2021 · Mija Van Der Wege
  • PSYC 250: Developmental Psychology

    An introduction to the concept of development, examining both theoretical models and empirical evidence. Prenatal through late childhood is covered with some discussion of adolescence when time permits. Topics include the development of personality and identity, social behavior and knowledge, and cognition. In addition, attention is paid to current applications of theory to such topics as: day care, the role of the media, and parenting. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor permission 6 credits; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Kathleen Galotti
  • PSYC 260: Health Psychology

    This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Within a biopsychosocial framework, we will analyze behavioral patterns and public policies that influence risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, substance abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases, among other conditions. Additionally, students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 6 credits; Science with Lab, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2021 · Gisel Flores-Montoya
  • PSYC 261: Health Psychology Lab

    This course provides students with direct experience applying principles of health psychology. Students will engage in a term-long self-directed project aimed at increasing the frequency of a healthy behavior (such as exercising) or decreasing the frequency of an unhealthy behavior (such as smoking). Additionally, we will read and discuss case studies that relate to the current topic in the lecture portion of the course. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 260. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

    Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in Psychology 260 2 credits; Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Science with Lab; offered Fall 2021 · Gisel Flores-Montoya
  • PSYC 290: Cross-Cultural Seminar in Prague: Directed Reading

    2 credits; S/CR/NC; offered Fall 2021 · Ken Abrams
  • PSYC 300: Special Topics in Psychological Research

    This course is a hands-on empirical research seminar related to a faculty member’s research program. Students are expected to collect and analyze data, read primary literature, meet regularly with the faculty supervisor, and submit a final paper. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor permission 1 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Sarah Meerts, Gisel Flores-Montoya, Mija Van Der Wege, Julia Strand, Neil Lutsky
  • PSYC 354: Counseling Psychology

    An introduction to theories, research, techniques, and issues in the field of counseling psychology.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Psychology 252 is recommended 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2021 · Steven Kozberg
  • PSYC 358: Cross-Cultural Psychology Seminar in Prague: Psychopathology

    In the West mental illness has traditionally been approached with a biomedical model that views it as independent of culture. By contrast the “relativist” position assumes that, to a large extent, human behaviors are culturally determined and that the etiology and manifestation of mental disorders are affected by society and culture. This course will address such issues as well as their implications for assessment and treatment through an examination of several Western and non-Western societies, with a special emphasis on Czech society. There will be several guest lectures by Czech psychology professors as well as excursions within Prague to psychiatric hospitals and clinics, where students will meet with Czech clinicians and patients. Prerequisites: Acceptance in Cross-Cultural Studies in Prague program 6 credits; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2021 · Ken Abrams
  • PSYC 399: Capstone Seminar

    Each of the three capstone seminars focus on a topic of interest to students in psychology. The goals of the course are to consider questions on a selected topic through reading primary research and discussion and review skills pertinent to scholarly investigation within the topic. Students are then mentored through a substantial paper related to the seminar topic.

    Prerequisites: Several 200-level Psychology courses and senior Psychology major 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022 · Julia Strand, Lawrence Wichlinski, Neil Lutsky, Ken Abrams

Winter 2022

  • PSYC 110: Principles of Psychology

    This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment. 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Mitchell Campbell, Lawrence Wichlinski, Gisel Flores-Montoya, Julia Strand, Julie Neiworth
  • PSYC 200: Measurement and Data Analysis in Psychology

    The course considers the role of measurement and data analysis focused on behavioral sciences. Various forms of measurement and standards for the evaluation of measures are explored. Students learn how to summarize, organize, and evaluate data using a variety of techniques that are applicable to research in psychology and other disciplines. Among the analyses discussed and applied are tests of means, various forms of analysis of variance, correlation and regression, planned and post-hoc comparisons, as well as various non-parametric tests. Research design is also explored. Prerequisites: Psychology 110, or Psychology/Cognitive Science 232/233, or instructor consent; Concurrent registration in Psychology 201 required 6 credits; Formal or Statistical Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2022 · Mija Van Der Wege
  • PSYC 201: Measurement and Data Analysis Lab

    This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills. Prerequisites: Psychology 110, or Psychology/Cognitive Science 232/233, or instructor permission. Concurrent registration in Psychology 200 is required. 2 credits; Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2022 · Mija Van Der Wege
  • PSYC 232: Cognitive Processes

    Cross-listed with CGSC 232. An introduction to the study of mental activity. Topics include attention, pattern recognition and perception, memory, concept formation, categorization, and cognitive development. Some attention is given to gender and individual differences in cognition, as well as cultural settings for cognitive activities. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both PSYC/CGSC 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor.; Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 233. 6 credits; offered Winter 2022
  • PSYC 233: Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes

    Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

    Prerequisites: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission. 2 credits; offered Winter 2022
  • PSYC 244: Positive Psychology

    This course evaluates the effort to use the tools of psychological science to understand the sources and nature of positive human strengths, characteristics, resources, and aspirations, and to apply any knowledge gained to help individuals and institutions function more effectively.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2022 · Neil Lutsky
  • PSYC 258: Social Cognition

    This course will focus on a social psychological analysis of social cognition, perception and judgment. It includes the examination of attitudes, stereotyping, attribution and the self. Concurrent registration in Psychology 259 is strongly suggested. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 258 and 259 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or permission of the instructor. 6 credits; Science with Lab; offered Winter 2022 · Mitchell Campbell
  • PSYC 259: Laboratory Research Methods in Social Cognition

    Students will participate in the design and replication of social psychological studies related to social cognition. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 258. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 258 and 259 to satisfy the LS requirement.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor permission 2 credits; Science with Lab, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2022 · Mitchell Campbell
  • PSYC 300: Special Topics in Psychological Research

    This course is a hands-on empirical research seminar related to a faculty member’s research program. Students are expected to collect and analyze data, read primary literature, meet regularly with the faculty supervisor, and submit a final paper. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor permission 1 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Sarah Meerts, Gisel Flores-Montoya, Mija Van Der Wege, Julia Strand, Neil Lutsky
  • PSYC 371: Evolutionary and Developmental Trends in Cognition

    Recent findings have brought to light some very compelling examples of humanlike cognition in nonhuman primates: tool use and tool making, family bonding, complex social behaviors such as cooperation, altruism, communication, and emotion. The study of infant cognition has also revealed more complex cognitive abilities in developing humans. Each of these topics is considered in the context of the cognitive workings of the primate mind, with emphasis on apes (gorilla, chimpanzee), monkeys (particularly cebus and rhesus varieties) and human children. The goal is to evaluate the uniqueness of primate cognition, both human and nonhuman.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or Biology 126 or Psychology 216 or instructor permission 6 credits; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2022 · Julie Neiworth
  • PSYC 379: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    This seminar will focus on the biological and psychological components of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. We will also address the possible causes of these disorders, and examine some current controversies surrounding diagnosis and treatment. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Lawrence Wichlinski, Steven Kozberg
  • PSYC 399: Capstone Seminar

    Each of the three capstone seminars focus on a topic of interest to students in psychology. The goals of the course are to consider questions on a selected topic through reading primary research and discussion and review skills pertinent to scholarly investigation within the topic. Students are then mentored through a substantial paper related to the seminar topic.

    Prerequisites: Several 200-level Psychology courses and senior Psychology major 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022 · Julia Strand, Lawrence Wichlinski, Neil Lutsky, Ken Abrams
  • PSYC 400: Integrative Exercise

    Students independently revise and extend the fall term paper, integrating the feedback from their faculty advisor.  Based on this work, students submit a final comps paper (approx. 20 pages) that makes original contributions to the field of psychology through critiquing existing psychology primary sources, applying empirically-supported psychological theories to new questions, generating potential applied guidelines, and/or proposing new theories or empirical studies based on published theories and empirical research.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 399 3 credits; S/NC; offered Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Lawrence Wichlinski, Neil Lutsky, Julia Strand, Ken Abrams, Sharon Akimoto, Julie Neiworth, Sarah Meerts, Gisel Flores-Montoya

Spring 2022

  • PSYC 110: Principles of Psychology

    This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment. 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Mitchell Campbell, Lawrence Wichlinski, Gisel Flores-Montoya, Julia Strand, Julie Neiworth
  • PSYC 216: Behavioral Neuroscience

    An introduction to the physiological bases of complex behaviors in mammals, with an emphasis on neural and hormonal mechanisms. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 216 and 217 to satisfy the LS requirement. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 217

    Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in Psychology 217; Psychology 110 6 credits; Science with Lab; offered Spring 2022 · Lawrence Wichlinski
  • PSYC 217: Laboratory Research Methods in Behavioral Neuroscience

    The course provides instruction and experience in methods of behavioral neuroscience, the study of the inter-relation of the brain (and hormonal systems) and behavior. The focus of this laboratory will be on standard methods of inducing behavioral changes via neural and hormonal manipulations in mammals. Psychology 217 requires concurrent registration in Psychology 216. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 216 and 217 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in Psychology 216; Psychology 110 2 credits; Science with Lab; offered Spring 2022 · Lawrence Wichlinski
  • PSYC 220: Sensation and Perception

    We will address the question of how humans acquire information from the world to support action, learning, belief, choice, and the host of additional mental states that comprise the subject matter of psychology. In other words “How do we get the outside inside?” We will initially consider peripheral anatomical structures (e.g. the eye) and proceed through intermediate levels of sensory coding and transmission to cover the brain regions associated with each of the major senses. Readings will include primary sources and a text. In addition to exams and papers, students will conduct an investigation into an area of personal interest. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor consent 6 credits; Science with Lab; offered Spring 2022 · Julia Strand
  • PSYC 221: Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception

    This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement. 2 credits; Science with Lab, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Julia Strand
  • PSYC 254: Psychopathology

    This course will focus on causal factors and clinical presentations of mental disorders, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, dissociative disorders, and psychotic disorders, among others. We will use an integrative approach that incorporates psychological, biological, interpersonal, and sociocultural perspectives. Methods of assessment and treatment will also at times be discussed.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2022 · Ken Abrams
  • PSYC 256: Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes

    The social psychological analysis of human social behavior, interpersonal processes, and group influences. Concurrent registration in Psychology 257 is optional, but strongly recommended. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 6 credits; Science with Lab; offered Spring 2022 · Sharon Akimoto
  • PSYC 257: Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes

    Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 256. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 2 credits; Science with Lab, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2022 · Sharon Akimoto
  • PSYC 300: Special Topics in Psychological Research

    This course is a hands-on empirical research seminar related to a faculty member’s research program. Students are expected to collect and analyze data, read primary literature, meet regularly with the faculty supervisor, and submit a final paper. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor permission 1 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Sarah Meerts, Gisel Flores-Montoya, Mija Van Der Wege, Julia Strand, Neil Lutsky
  • PSYC 375: Language and Deception

    In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use. We will take up three main issues. The first is what it means to deceive and how people deceive others through language. What methods do they use, and how do these methods work? The second issue is why people deceive. What purposes do their deceptions serve in court, in advertising, in bureaucracies, in business transactions, and in everyday face-to-face conversation? The third issue is the ethics of deception. Is it legitimate to deceive others, and if so, when and why? Prerequisites: Psychology 232, 234, 238 or Cognitive Science 236. 6 credits; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2022 · Mija Van Der Wege
  • PSYC 382: Topics in Social and Personality: Endings

    This seminar will examine the psychology of endings, including endings associated with psychotherapy, social interactions, personal relationships, social roles, literature and the arts, and life itself. We will address when and how endings occur, how we experience endings, and what makes an ending a good or poor one, among other issues. Prerequisites: Psychology 252, 256, 258, or instructor permission 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2022 · Neil Lutsky
  • PSYC 386: Intervention Science: Using Psychology to Advance Social Good

    Many of the most pressing issues facing our world today, including prejudice/discrimination, climate change, health, conflict, and polarization/radicalization, ultimately stem from human behavior. As a science centrally focused on human behavior, psychology is well-poised to contribute meaningfully to developing solutions to these and other issues. In this class, we will review the rapidly expanding literature on intervention science, which involves employing psychological concepts and principles to change real-world outcomes. We will also study relevant behavioral science and motivational theories, as well as examining how findings from the lab can be translated to real-world applications. Students will also complete a final project that will involve conducting their own intervention experiment in the field. Students will leave the class equipped to use their knowledge of behavioral science to effect change in the real world to address the issues they care about. 

    Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or instructor consent 6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2022 · Mitchell Campbell
  • PSYC 400: Integrative Exercise

    Students independently revise and extend the fall term paper, integrating the feedback from their faculty advisor.  Based on this work, students submit a final comps paper (approx. 20 pages) that makes original contributions to the field of psychology through critiquing existing psychology primary sources, applying empirically-supported psychological theories to new questions, generating potential applied guidelines, and/or proposing new theories or empirical studies based on published theories and empirical research.

    Prerequisites: Psychology 399 3 credits; S/NC; offered Winter 2022, Spring 2022 · Lawrence Wichlinski, Neil Lutsky, Julia Strand, Ken Abrams, Sharon Akimoto, Julie Neiworth, Sarah Meerts, Gisel Flores-Montoya