Nobel Prize Winner to Speak about the Economic Implications of Global Warming

Thomas C. Schelling, winner of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Economics and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, will present the weekly convocation address on Friday, May 9 at 10:50 a.m. in the Skinner Memorial Chapel. Schelling’s presentation, entitled “Can We Manage the Greenhouse Problem?,” will address the economic implications of reducing green house gas emissions. This event is free and open to the public.

2 May 2008 Posted In:
Thomas C. Schelling
Thomas C. SchellingPhoto:

Thomas C. Schelling, winner of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Economics and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, will present the weekly convocation address on Friday, May 9 at 10:50 a.m. in the Skinner Memorial Chapel. Schelling’s presentation, entitled “Can We Manage the Greenhouse Problem?,” will address the economic implications of reducing green house gas emissions. This event is free and open to the public.

In 1960 Schelling published “The Strategy of Conflict,” a book that pioneered the study of bargaining and game-theory against the backdrop of the nuclear arms race in the 1950s. It also introduced the concept of the focal point, now called the Schelling point, as it pertains to solutions used in the absence of communication in game-theory. Subsequently, Schelling’s insights have been useful in international conflict resolution, cooperation, and efforts to avoid war, thus earning him the Nobel Prize in Economics along with Robert J. Aumann in 2005. “The Strategy on Conflict” is among one hundred books deemed most influential in the West since 1945.

Active in the global warming debate since chairing a commission for President Carter in 1980, Schelling believes climate change negatively impacts developing nations, but that addressing the problem will then create economic repercussions in wealthier nations. He deems the issue a bargaining problem, with poorer countries benefiting from greenhouse gas emission reduction, while more developed nations bear the brunt of the cost. As an expert economist, Schelling also participated in the Copenhagen Consensus, a project that establishes priorities for advancing global welfare based on the theory of welfare economics.

Schelling is the Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Political Economy, Emeritus, at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, where he taught for twenty years. He currently teaches at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, specializing in the fields of foreign affairs, national security, nuclear strategy, and arms control.

This event is sponsored by the Carleton College Office of College Relations. For more information on the convocation and disability accommodations call (507) 222-4308.