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What is it?

LinkedIn Learning, previously also known as Lynda.com, is a large library of free online tutorials that cover a broad spectrum of software applications, hardware tutorials, and web-focused development and coding skills.  Linkedin Learning also contains a wide variety of soft skill tutorials on topics like teamwork, conflict resolution and emotional intelligence.

Why is this useful?

The tutorials in LinkedIn Learning can be useful to both you and your students. You can use the tutorials to deepen your understanding of the software applications you have been using for many years or to learn new ones. 

As all students at Carleton also have access to this tool, you can create a list of video tutorials for your courses that will provide your students access to learning about the software tools you expect them to be comfortable with. This gives you the leeway to assign projects that might require video or audio recording, or the creation of online presentations.  Use Linkedin Leaning to provide the background information your students might need to create these items.

How do I use it at Carleton?

Log into LinkedIn Learning. Search or browse for topics of interest to you. Note that LinkedIn Learning may ask to connect your personal LinkedIn profile with your Carleton College LinkedIn Learning account. You are not required to do this. In fact, if you work mostly on a lab computer or have privacy concerns, you should choose the option Continue without LinkedIn.

LinkedIn writes that linking your personal profile “will allow for a more personalized learning experience, including special course recommendations based on your job title, skills, and industry information contained in your LinkedIn profile” which you may or may not want. View LinkedIn FAQs for additional information.

Carleton News Releases:

Getting started with LinkedIn Learning at Carleton: 

First video in the “How to use LinkedIn Learning” course:

Teaching Tips:

With LinkedIn Learning, you can be confident that your students have access to tutorials on a broad range of topics.  This gives you the leeway to assign work beyond traditional paper writing. Consider asking your students to create a podcast, design a webpage, or edit a wiki page as a supplement or replacement for a more traditional assignment.