The sections for GERM 101, 102, and 103 are flexible for you to enroll in. If you have a conflict between your MWF / TTH classes and a 5-day language class schedule, you can talk with Juliane Schicker (jschicker@carleton) to cross-enroll in 2 sections at the same time. Eventually, you will have to fill out a yellow drop/add card to add the course (pick up at Registrar’s Office). Seek the signature of your German professor and the professor of the course with which your German course conflicts. Also seek your adviser’s signature and then return the card to the Registrar.

For Minors and Majors: can’t fit a certain course into your schedule? A certain course is not offered in the term you need it? Chat with us to find a substitute.

  • GERM 100: Seeking Shelter in a Dangerous World

    Where do I feel at home? What causes me to feel not at home in certain spaces? In the face of transforming societies and environments, can a stable sense of home be preserved—and should it be? In this course, we will study texts from a wide range of geographic locations and cultural backgrounds that investigate the stakes of creating a sense of home within unfamiliar, unwelcoming, and seemingly ruined environments. Ultimately, we will seek ways to think both critically and creatively about human environments, both in cultural texts and in our own reflection on the places we call home.

    6 credits; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Seth Peabody
  • GERM 101: Elementary German

    This course introduces the basic structures of the German language and everyday vocabulary in the context of common cultural situations and authentic and fictional media. Students are exposed to all four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking).

    6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2022 · Juliane Schicker
  • GERM 102: Elementary German

    Building on the material covered in German 101, this course introduces more complex structures and exposes students to short literary and cultural texts as well as other media. The focus of the course is on all four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking).

    Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2023 · Kiley Kost
  • GERM 103: Intermediate German

    Continuation of the study of complex structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of longer texts, films, and other media from German-speaking cultures.

    Prerequisites: German 102 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2023 · Seth Peabody
  • GERM 150: German Music and Culture from Mozart to Rammstein

    In this course, we survey significant developments in German-language culture, broadly defined, from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Students of all disciplines and majors are invited to receive an overview of the music and culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, starting in the 1750s and tracing its impact into the present time. The course includes literature, film, music, language, history, habits, news, etc., and surveys major figures, movements, and their influence on the world’s civilization. The course encourages critical engagement with the material at hand and provides the opportunity to compare it with the students’ own cultural background. Taught in English.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2023 · Juliane Schicker
  • GERM 152: Personhood

    What is it to be human? What is the difference between human and animal? How do technology and AI alter our understanding of humanity? How does the rhetoric of personhood affect our judgment of others? What is an immigrant, a migrant, a refugee, a foreigner, an alien? In this English-language survey of German thought and literature, we will ask these questions with foundational philosophers from the Enlightenment to the present, engage with contemporary theorists on post-colonialism and nationalism, and rethink the concept of personhood by analyzing crucial new contributions from literature, theater, film, and art. Taught in English.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 204: Intermediate German

    In this course, students build on their communication skills to engage in more in-depth spoken and written discussions of German-speaking literature, art, and culture. By analyzing longer and more challenging texts, films and other cultural media, continuing grammar review, and writing compositions, students acquire greater facility and confidence in all four language skills (writing, speaking, listening, and reading).

    Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2022 · Seth Peabody
  • GERM 205: Berlin Program: Intermediate Composition and Conversation

    This course is designed for students with intermediate proficiency in German, who wish to extend their knowledge of German language and culture through reading, discussions, and writing. Students will work on developing the ability to articulate opinions, exchange substantive information and to argue points of view; honing analytic and interpretive writing skills; and expanding their linguistic toolkit. The class format features discussions with grammar exercises interspersed as needed. Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent and acceptance in Berlin Program 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2022 · Kiley Kost
  • GERM 208: Coffee and News

    An excellent opportunity to brush up your German while learning about current issues in German-speaking countries. Relying on magazines, newspapers, podcasts, and streamings, students will discuss common topics and themes once a week to exchange their ideas over snacks with a small group of students. 

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 2 credits; S/CR/NC; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Juliane Schicker
  • GERM 212: Contemporary Germany in Global Context

    Over the past few years, Germany has been touted as the new leader of Europe, or even of the “free world,” and at the same time has seen a surge of bitter political division within its borders. The Berlin Wall fell thirty years ago, yet tensions between East and West remain stark. Chancellor Angela Merkel implemented an open-arms policy toward refugees, yet the extremist AfD party has orchestrated a troubling rise to power based on xenophobic sentiments. And while Germany has emerged as a global environmental leader, it has simultaneously faced passionate protest from its own youth regarding failure to meet the challenges of climate change. In this class, we examine the complexities behind these seeming contradictions in contemporary Germany by analyzing diverse texts ranging from political speeches to poetry slams. Taught in German; advanced grammar review supports analytical tasks.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 214: What’s New: The Latest Works in German-Speaking Media

    What products in literature, film, and other media did German-speaking audiences consume in the recent past? What topics do artists address and media outlets discuss? In this course, we will read, watch, and examine various texts and films that were published or premiered in the last ten years or so in the German language. These works, written by a diverse range of artists, reflect on and respond to the turbulent recent history not only in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, but also more globally. They will help us determine how people express their most urgent challenges and how these texts participate in public debates. 

    Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2023 · Juliane Schicker
  • GERM 216: German Short Prose

    The course introduces students to the joys and challenges of reading short German fictional and non-fictional texts of various genres from three centuries, including fairy tales, aphorisms, short stories, novellas, tweets, essays, and newspaper articles. We will read slowly and with an eye to grammar and vocabulary building, while also concentrating on developing an understanding of German cultural history. Texts and class discussions will be in German.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 221: (re/ex)press yourself: Sexuality and Gender in Fin-de-Siècle Literature and Art

    In this course, we will explore literature and art of German-speaking countries around the topics of gender and sex(uality). We will focus on the years between 1880 and 1920, but also venture into more recent times. What was the image of men and women at the time and how did these images change or remain the same? How did science factor into these images? What was/is considered “normal” when it comes to sex(uality) and gender, and what German-speaking voices have been pushing against those norms? How did these voices use literature and art to reflect or criticize such norms? Texts and class discussions will be in English. 

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 223: Thinking Green in German

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent and concurrent registration in German 223 2 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 223: Thinking Green: Sustainability, Literature, and Culture in Germany

    Germany is a recognized worldwide leader in environmental movements thanks to the nuclear power phase-out, the renewable energy transition, and the rise of the Green Party. Similarly, there is a long aesthetic tradition depicting nature and the nonhuman world in German-language literature and poetry. In this course, conducted in English, we will trace the development of contemporary Germany’s environmental practices through its literary and cultural legacy by reading and analyzing texts from established writers and thinkers. We will connect these literary and historic roots to contemporary environmental issues, look at successful protest movements, and explore Germany as a model for environmental initiatives and engaged citizenship around the globe.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 247: Mirror, Mirror: Reflecting on Fairy Tales and Folklore

    Many people are familiar with the fairy tales collected and published by the Brothers Grimm and have seen iterations of such stories in animated Disney films and live-action reboots. In this class, taught in English, we will critically examine folktales, consider their role in shaping societal standards and how they spread specific values across cultures. We will study the origins of Grimms’ fairy tales before discussing their larger role across media and cultures. Our study of traditional German fairy tales will be informed by contemporary theoretical approaches including feminist theory, ecocriticism, psychology, and animal studies.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 251: Identity, Belonging, and Spaces of Home in the Works of Fatma Aydemir

    In this course, offered in conjunction with the Christopher Light Lectureship, we will familiarize ourselves with the work of contemporary German author Fatma Aydemir, focussing particularly on her publications that deal with questions of migration and Heimat. We will read and discuss several fictional and nonfictional texts, participate in a creative nonfiction workshop and other events with Aydemir herself, and exhibit final projects at a public event.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent or instructor consent 2 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 258: Berlin Program: Berlin Memory Politics

    Vergangenheitsbewältigung is the German word for reconciling the past; it is a process that has shaped collective memory in Germany and other European countries since the end of the Holocaust and World War II. Berlin in particular has been formed by its difficult history and memories, the traces of which are visible in the city today. In this class, we will examine the relationship between history, memory, and collective identity in Germany. How are narratives of the past preserved in the present? Which stories are told, which are left out, and who makes these decisions? How does the geography of a city interact with its history? How do memorials impact public space? In addition to analyzing fiction, essays, and visual culture, we will also confront this topic through several field trips and walks in Berlin.

    Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent and acceptance in Berlin program 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Kiley Kost
  • GERM 259: Berlin Program: German in Motion: Migration, Place and Displacement

    How is your identity connected to a certain place? And what happens when you leave that place, either voluntarily or out of necessity? In this course, we will learn about migration in German-speaking countries by reading historical and contemporary texts and researching policies on asylum and migration. We will critically examine concepts of the nation and nationality in historical contexts, learn about artists in exile, and encounter contemporary perspectives on migration in Europe. Course activities will include several site visits in Berlin. By reading and analyzing texts by Hannah Arendt, Bertolt Brecht, Anna Seghers, Ilse Aichinger, Paul Celan, May Ayim, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Yoko Tawada, and Fatma Aydemir among many others, we will become mindful readers of different literary genres and craft thoughtful analyses on topics connected to migration.

    Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent and acceptance in Berlin program 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Kiley Kost
  • GERM 267: Catastrophe! Natural Disaster in German Literature

    Are natural disasters ever really natural? In this course, taught in German, we will read works of literature and poetry that portray disaster. Focusing on disaster as the site of interaction between humans and the environment, we will explore and discuss the impact of modern technology, contemporary environmental issues, and the concept of disaster in the shadow of war. Thinking in terms of environmental justice, we will also consider who is impacted by such disasters and in what ways. We will read various genres of literature including works by Hoffmann, Frisch, Wolf, Haushofer and Maron among many others.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 274: Weimar Germany: Art, Culture, and the Failure of Democracy

    “…many will say: even 1920 is not so horrible. This is how it is: the human being is a machine, culture is in shreds, education is arrogance, spirit is brutality, stupidity is the norm, and the military is sovereign” (Adolf Behne, reporting on a Dada art exhibit). In this class, taught in German, students examine cultural products and visual media of and about the Weimar Republic to understand a critical time in German history and explore how art has been used to cope with societal turbulence. Note: German majors and minors may complete additional work to count this class toward the 300-level course credit requirement.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2023 · Kiley Kost
  • GERM 305: Berlin Program: Advanced Composition and Conversation

    This course is designed for students with advanced proficiency in German, who wish to extend their knowledge of German language and culture through reading, discussions, and writing. Students will work on developing the ability to articulate opinions, exchange substantive information and to argue points of view; honing analytic and interpretive writing skills; and expanding their linguistic toolkit. The class format features discussions with grammar exercises interspersed as needed.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2022 · Kiley Kost
  • GERM 320: Life under Socialism: Culture and Society in East Germany

    What was life like under “actually existing socialism?” What films, books, music, and other media did people in the German Democratic Republic (or East Germany) consume and how did they cope with their country’s dictatorship? How can the experiences of people—particularly women—living in the GDR provide useful context for contemporary socio-political issues in the United States and beyond? We will discuss topics such as gender equality, education, health care, and queer life in the GDR. Taught in German.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 321: On the Edge: Monsters, Robots, and Cyborgs

    In this course, taught in German, students explore nonhuman figures in literature and film. How do authors and filmmakers depict monsters, robots, cyborgs, and other nonhumans? And what do these figures reveal about what makes us human? By tracing the boundaries of the human through notable texts, we consider the cultural, psychological, and technological implications of these almost-human figures. Selected works include texts by E. T. A. Hoffmann, Franz Kafka, Sharon Dodua Otoo and films by Fritz Lang and F. W. Murnau.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent or instructor consent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 342: Faust and the Soul

    We all know the story: Faust sells his soul to the devil. It does change over time though: once for 24 years of magic, then for knowledge, also for bliss. From the first Faust book via Christopher Marlowe’s play, to Goethe’s masterpiece and Thomas Mann’s novel, all the way to contemporary film and even Homer Simpson selling his soul for a donut, what is at stake in the Faust legend? Just what is the soul? Via the figure of Faust, how can we understand key periods and works in German-language literature, film, and thought throughout the ages? Taught in German.

    Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2022–2023
  • GERM 359: Berlin Program: German in Motion: Migration, Place, and Displacement

    How is your identity connected to a certain place? And what happens when you leave that place, either voluntarily or out of necessity? In this course, we will learn about migration in German-speaking countries by reading historical and contemporary texts and researching policies on asylum and migration. We will critically examine concepts of the nation and nationality in historical contexts, learn about artists in exile, and encounter contemporary perspectives on migration in Europe. Course activities will include several site visits in Berlin. By reading and analyzing texts by Hannah Arendt, Bertolt Brecht, Anna Seghers, Ilse Aichinger, Paul Celan, May Ayim, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Yoko Tawada, and Fatma Aydemir among many others, we will become mindful readers of different literary genres and craft thoughtful analyses on topics connected to migration.

    Prerequisites: German 103 or equivalent and acceptance in Berlin Program 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Kiley Kost
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 1 credit; S/NC; offered Spring 2023