Each year Carleton’s fellowships make it possible for a number of students to engage in independent research, explore their passions, or embark on an adventure. All of these opportunities are made possible by the generosity of Carleton alumni, parents and friends of the college; they are completed over a summer or during Carleton’s winter break. The following is a summary of Carleton’s 2022-23 fellowship awards.

Chang-Lan Fellowship

  • Kristoff Cao ’25 will (with Richard Liu ’25) explore and analyze how China’s Zero-COVID policy was implemented on a grassroots level, focusing on street-level governments’ (residential committees’) experience in responding to COVID-19.
  • Dingyun Cui ’24 will visit and work at museums in China’s Xinjiang and Ningxia provinces to explore whether museum displays selectively evoke memories to uphold specific understandings of national identities.
  • Taaja Foster ’24 will shadow medical doctors in China for two weeks, with the goal of understanding how China’s long history of traditional medicine impacts modern health care.
  • Chaofan Han ’25 will spend time in five distinct Chinese cities—Datong, Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Guizhou—to experiment with various aesthetic approaches to document and express ‘China’ through street photography.
  • Richard Liu ’25 will (with Kristoff Cao ’25) explore and analyze how China’s Zero-COVID policy was implemented on a grassroots level, focusing on street-level governments’ (residential committees’) experience in responding to COVID-19.
  • Kunwu Lyu ’25 will use the reference point of protests against COVID restrictions in China to consider the existential dynamics behind acts of protest that cannot hope to produce tangible results.
  • Wanying Na ’24 will conduct participant observation of clinical interactions in a large, state-funded hospital and in local community health centers in Taiyuan, China, to learn about the healthcare needs and perception of urban and rural populations, especially those of Hmong ethnic background.
  • Kate Ng ’25 will use Hong Kong cinema (1950s to the present) to explore the creation and evolution of a distinctive Hong Kong culture.
  • Xiaoying Qu ’25 aims to capture the unique beauty and culture of Qingdao, a coastal city of Northeast China, through a photography project focused on the city’s coastal scenery, bustling port activities, indigenous fishing practices, and relationship with the sea.
  • Tan Zhou ’25 will return to Tibet to re-engage with previous nonprofit work and preliminary research on culture-related subjects, in order to enrich a memoir she hopes to publish based on her experiences there.

Class of 1963 Fellowship

  • Helen Banta ’25 will use a fellowship to support travel and accommodation costs associated with participation in the Woman Latinists program through Forte Academy in Florence, Italy.
  • Ethan Kinsella ’25 will explore the work of German-Bohemian architect Balthasar Neumann, who was responsible for many of the buildings which define the Rococo style, using both analytical and poetic writing to respond to Neumann’s use of space.
  • Cynthia (Xinyi) Leng ’25 will use text analysis tools to delve into the life stories of 100 Tibetan women, with the goal of creating a catalogue of biographies, analysis, and visualizations; gaining a better understanding of Tibetan history; and deepening her engagement with the digital humanities.
  • Douglas Meeker ’24 will explore England’s queer literary spaces to better understand the relationship between queerness and space in 19th and 20th-century English literature and to examine current attitudes toward queerness in the presentation and preservation of these spaces.
  • Hermela Shiferaw ’24 will assess how current formal and informal institutions in Ethiopia interpret and respond to gender-based violence, and evaluate their effectiveness, using organizations at Addis Ababa University as case studies.
  • Hannah Ward ’24 will observe and experiment with various species of plants and fungi, to explore the theory of biocommunication and plant perception, and will use various art mediums to depict the connection between art and the sciences in a visually captivating way.
  • Sequoia Wyckoff ’25 will research contemporary eco-writing, giving attention to how personal identity and geographic context interact with environmental identity, through readings at local libraries and interviews with experts.

David C. Donelson ’77 Fund Fellowships

  • Andras Galambos ‘24 will create a kinetic sand table, bringing together the worlds of robotics and Zen sand art, using the tools and resources of the Carleton makerspace and instrument shop.
  • Devin Lewis ’24 will visit and explore various locations in Chicago to gather contextual information for his proposed futuristic novel set in the city.
  • Will Prim ‘25 will participate in the apprenticeship program at Bread and Puppet Theater in Glover, Vermont, where he will be thrown into the work of running a non-profit theater and arts collective while living within a rural, close-knit intentional-living community.

Professor Roy F. Grow Fellowship

  • Conor Babcock O’Neill ’24 will travel to Thailand (with Leo Jordan ’24) to advance his skills in nature writing through exploration of conservation practices and ecological research, particularly in coastal and marine environments.
  • Dorothy Si-Jhen Chou ’25 will travel to Thailand (with Jonathan Nguyen ’25 and Alex Vue ’25) to gain a cultural understanding of Southeast Asian culture and beliefs in traditional medicines in relation to public health, as well as how socio-economic factors affect the accessibility of health care for different populations.
  • Tonushree Chowdhury ’24 will use the framing of orality and Australian Aboriginal Songlines to explore cultural, religious, and geographical identity in her Indian family, with the goal of creating and performing a Songline that encodes that knowledge.
  • Ryan Dunn ’25 will explore the intersection of visual arts and music through various traditional Japanese forms (including Ukiyo-e and Kabuki), as well as Zakuro performances, building on his Carleton coursework in music and art history.
  • Isaac Endo ’25 will travel to Japan (with Gitanjali Matthes ’25) investigate the contemporary Japanese cultural relationship to nature via art, ecotourism, agriculture, and urbanization by exploring disaster mitigation infrastructure and terrace farming, contemporary art, and built environments, along with participating as a volunteer farm worker.
  • Soren Eversoll ’24 will return to his birthplace of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to explore the emerging, globalized “third culture” as it is manifested in the expatriate teaching community there, and to document the experience through filmmaking.
  • Valentina Guerrero Chala ’24 hopes to explore how alternative models of development are articulated, negotiated, and materialized from the perspective of the pluriverse through volunteering at a sustainable living and learning center in northern Thailand.
  • Shaheer Jaffar ‘24 will travel to Malaysia and Pakistan to gain a first-hand understanding, through work with local and international NGOs, of immigration policies and their impact on migrant workers.
  • Leo Jordan ’24 will travel to Thailand to advance his skills in photography through exploration of conservation practices and ecological research, particularly in coastal and marine environments.
  • Moe Kojima ’24 will observe, practice, and discuss dance with dance communities including professional dancers and choreographers in Thailand and Japan, in order to both connect dance with SOAN and GWSS perspectives and cultivate choreographic skills and practices.
  • Gitanjali Matthes ’25 will travel to Japan (with Isaac Endo ’25) to investigate the contemporary Japanese cultural relationship to nature via art, ecotourism, agriculture, and urbanization by exploring disaster mitigation infrastructure and terrace farming, contemporary art, and built environments, along with participating as a volunteer farm worker.
  • Jonathan Nguyen ’25 will travel to Thailand (with Dorothy Si-Jhen Chou ’25 and Alex Vue ’25) to gain a cultural understanding of Southeast Asian culture and beliefs in traditional medicines in relation to public health, as well as how socio-economic factors affect the accessibility of health care for different populations.
  • William Phillips Longley ’24 will work with a gender-rights-oriented Thai NGO to explore the culturally specific construction of gender and gain experience that will contribute to an eventual comps project in philosophy.
  • Peter Sallinger ’25 will travel to Malaysia to research the impact of China’s Belt and Road Initiative projects there.
  • Annanya Sinha25 will travel to India to create a film documenting the lives and experiences of Kolkata’s Hijra community.
  • Alex Vue ’25 will travel to Thailand (with Dorothy Si-Jhen Chou ’25 and Jonathan Nguyen ’25) to gain a cultural understanding of Southeast Asian culture and beliefs in traditional medicines in relation to public health, as well as how socio-economic factors affect the accessibility of health care for different populations.
  • Xi Wang ’26 will undertake ethnographic fieldwork (supported partially by a Yueh-Townsend Fellowship) in a Chinese-Tibetan district to understand how its education system is enhanced by government and NGO support and limited by practical problems including regional poverty and geographical and cultural barriers.
  • Caleb Wataoka ’24 will travel to Japan to explore music across urban and rural contexts, and improve his Japanese language skills by living and working with host families.

Dale and Elizabeth Hanson Fellowship in Ethics

  • Ryan Cechini ’25 will explore when and how paternalistic action is permissible, considering a broad range of types of paternalism across different situations.
  • Micah Day-O’Connell ’25 will investigate alternative ethical systems such as virtue ethics, daoism, existentialism, and ethics of care, and see if they can resolve problems around alienation and the paradox of formal ethical study.
  • Harald Lundberg ’24 will investigate the new natural language processing AI programs such as ChatGPT that have exploded in popularity in the last few months, with specific reference to how they may redefine our understanding of plagiarism.
  • Ella Peoples ’25 will research educational ethics and philosophy, emphasizing learning, teaching, and academic responsibility in the context of underserved communities, including communities of color, in the United States.
  • Alex Wang ’26 plans to engage in research that will challenge the conventional image of ‘cults,” evaluate the validity of the accusations imposed on “cults,” and try to understand how “cults” make sense to people.

Independent Research Fellowship

  • Sadhana Mandala ’24 will travel to Egypt and use it as a case study to understand the short and long-term economic, political, and cultural impact of Chinese foreign direct investment on the African continent.
  • Catherine Merchant ’24 will address various questions about the relationship between religion (or spirituality) and therapy through a broad literature review and a series of focused interviews with counseling professionals.
  • Aleksander Prasolov ’24 will investigate how Richard Strauss communicated the struggle with death, musically, through a tone poem he wrote as a young man and the one of his ‘Four Last Songs.’
  • Aidan Walker ’24 will investigate how church tourism affects the way people interface with and experience sacred spaces by exploring the tension between the sacred locale and profane tourism activities in Europe.
  • Jackson Walker ‘24 will explore the lived experiences of people of different genders in karate spaces, and how different dojos think about their relationship to “traditional” karate, in preparation for a SoAn comps project.
  • April Wurst ’24 will explore the types of queer and counterculture communities that arise through underground raves in Budapest, Hungary.

Kelley International Fellowship

  • Bee Candelaria ’24 will travel to Rome (with Ren Manuel ’24) to explore forms of media available to the public, including works of art intended for private collectors, theological works accessible to all, and the Classical archaeological works which informed later pieces. Bee’s particular emphasis is popular culture accessible to the pre-modern poor.
  • Ren Manuel ’24 will travel to Rome (with Bee Candelaria ’24) to explore forms of media available to the public, including works of art intended for private collectors, theological works accessible to all, and the Classical archaeological works which informed later pieces. Ren’s particular emphasis is Renaissance art forms.

Larson International Fellowship

  • Tori Aguado ’24 will travel to Spain to investigate the making and unmaking of culturally fragmented identity through a two-part exploration of the unfamiliarity of land and the bond of family, laying the groundwork for a Cinema and Media Studies comps short film.
  • Lily Akre ’25 will travel to the Tautra Mariakloster in Norway to explore what religion means to people whose everyday life is informed by religious practice in community.  
  • Amira Aladetan ’24 will volunteer at a health clinic and engage with healthcare professionals in Lagos, Nigeria, to deepen her understanding of comparative and global public health provision and improve her Yoruba language skills.
  • Owen Flanagan ‘25 will travel to the Czech Republic to examine how the country’s histories of Soviet domination and the Velvet Revolution that ended it are presented both directly,  through museums and memorials, and more subtly, around Prague. See Owen’s poster!
  • Sam Gilbert ’24 will travel to New Zealand to examine how place influences, challenges, and grounds contemporary and historical Maori protest movements, using embodied physical site visits, interviews with ecologists and activists, and external sources of information such as rangers’ stations and museums.
  • Tori Gray ’24 will use the support of a Larson Fellowship to enrich her upcoming OCS experience in London by exploring tourism and identity there.
  • George Lefkowicz ’25 will travel to Botswana to work as a teaching assistant at a school in the capital city, living on campus with students and faculty and working in the classroom and non-educational settings to learn first-hand about the educational system there and assist students as they prepare for their future paths.
  • Lydia Montgomery ’24 will attend the National Eisteddfod in Wales (a music and poetry event) to practice her Welsh language skills, interview native speakers about the language, and continue the robust Welsh poetic tradition by writing verse of her own.
  • Elly Pickette ’25 will travel to Spain to explore attitudes along the Camino de Santiago about various forms of access the route allows. Elly hopes to understand the accessibility of the Camino, both in resources that exist and in attitudes hikers hold.
  • Hermela Samuel ’26 will travel to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to explore urban farming and how communities organize and act collectively to pursue growth and food security.
  • Ian Scott ’24 will travel to Northern Ireland to work with youth-focused reconciliation strategies designed to catalyze healing from the divisive sectarian conflict experienced there, with an emphasis on understanding art as an invitation to explore belonging and sense of place.
  • Amelia Watt ’25 will build on an OCS experience in Romania to explore the effectiveness of art as a form of resistance and conformity under Ceaușescu and how that legacy influences contemporary Romanian art.

Paglia Post-Bac Research Fellowship

  • Sam Hiken ’23 will join the research group of Virginia Vassilevska Williams at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
  • Aya Klos ’23 will join the Kaçar research group at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
  • Elena Morales-Grahl ’23 will join Dr. Andrea Gore’s research group at the University of Texas–Austin.

Richard Salisbury Fellowship

  • Natalia Crimmel ’24 will travel to Dakar, Senegal, to intern with ANCS, the organization that directs the country’s HIV response, working in two of the organization’s domains of action: increasing access to prevention resources and promoting social acceptance of people living with HIV.

Yueh-Townsend Fellowship

  • Xi Wang ’26 will undertake ethnographic fieldwork (supported partially by a Professor Roy F. Grow Fellowship) in a Chinese-Tibetan district to understand how its education system is enhanced by government and NGO support and limited by practical problems including regional poverty and geographical and cultural barriers.

Nancy Wilkie Fellowship for Archaeological Field Experience

  • Marta Kondratiuk ’25 will attend the Rutgers University Archaeological Field School in Italy.
  • Samantha Zimmerman ’24 will attend the Balkan Heritage Field School – Emporion Pistiros, in Bulgaria.

Winter Break 2022 Senior Comps Research Fellowship Recipients

  • Sophia Chuen ’23 (Linguistics)
  • Cassie Cunniff ’23 (Environmental Studies)
  • Hannah Davis ’23 (Political Science/International Relations)
  • Diaraye Diallo ’23 (Environmental Studies)
  • Naiya Karl ’23 (Sociology/Anthropology)
  • Yumo Lu ’23 (Cinema and Media Studies)
  • Astrid Malter ’23 (Cinema and Media Studies)
  • Nadia McPherson ’23 (Cinema and Media Studies)
  • Rylyn Monahan ’23 (Art History)
  • Zia NoiseCat ’23 (Environmental Studies)
  • Aldo Polanco ’23 (Art History)
  • Beck Woollen ’23 (Environmental Studies)