Digital Humanities Tutoring

Digital Humanities Tutoring

Our Digital Humanities Associates provide support for classes with digital humanities components. Either in class or at evening office hours, our DHAs can help students create accounts, answer questions about a variety of digital tools and metadata, or just help students get started.

In addition, DHAs have worked with faculty and staff to create and maintain metadata guidelines for students in these courses to use. We have provided support to a variety of courses, in departments including French, History, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Classics, and Environmental Studies. Learn more about Digital Humanities Tutoring.


Digital Workhouse

Digital Workhouse

The Digital Workhouse project is a multi-year project directed by Professor Susannah Ottaway in collaboration with Professor Austin Mason. This project examines historic architecture and furniture, while drawing from archival documents to re-create a virtual atmosphere and experience of an 18th century workhouse. We create 3-D architectural and object models with Google SketchUp and Blender respectively, and use Unity to combine the virtual models into a walkthrough game experience.

The Virtual Workhouse Digital Archive holds images of workhouse archival documents and photographs of workhouse buildings. Professors Ottaway and Mason co-taught “Bringing the English Past to Virtual Life,” which explores digital tools to teach and learn about eighteenth-century workhouses. More information about the course can be found on the course blog.

DHA work on the project has spanned many years, the DHAs involved are Florence Wong ’16, Graham Earley ’17, Elizabeth Budd ’19 and Tyler Chang ’20.


Prairie Creek Digital Collection

Prairie Creek

Prairie Creek is a protected area of wild prairie in Minnesota. We have helped manage and compile a digital collection comprised of photographs and documents detailing the species occupying Prairie Creek, historical records and oral histories pertaining to the site, volunteer projects on the site, and the like.

This archive is housed in CONTENTdm and built through contributions from Professor Kim Smith’s ENTS 110 course and from the Friends of Prairie Creek. Check out the collection!


Carleton Guide to Medieval Rome

Carleton Guide to Medieval Rome

The Carleton Guide to Medieval Rome is a project with Professor Victoria Morse in History that presents information about the forgotten medieval history of the city of Rome, better known for its ancient past and modern present. Created in collaboration with faculty, staff, and students of the Carleton History Off-Campus Rome Program, this project aims to distill some of the insights in the scholarly literature into a public guide for the benefit of the traveler and visitor to the city.


Witness to the Revolution

Witness to the Revolution

“Witness to the Revolution” is a geographically accurate 3D serious gaming experience that allows players to explore the contradictory nature of the evidence surrounding the Boston Massacre. Players collect depositions, make decisions about which seem the most reliable, and witness a recreation of the Boston Massacre given those decisions.

“Witness to the Revolution” was built using GIS mapping software, procedural modeling techniques, and the Unity 3D game engine. Professors Serena Zabin and Austin Mason lead the project, which began in a course in Winter 2017, for which DHAs provided out of class support to students in the class. Learn more about the “Witness to the Revolution” blog.


Global Religions in Minnesota

Global Religions in Minnesota

Working in conjunction with Professors Shana Sippy and Michael McNally, students in the Global Religions in Minnesota religion course have been conducting research into the variety of lived religious experiences in Minnesota. The DHAs provided support to students in the course and Shana Sippy to create an Omeka site that will present all of this important research in a clear and concise manner: Religions in Minnesota.