Fall 2021

  • LATN 101: Elementary Latin

    While many claims are made about the benefits of learning Latin, here’s what we know for sure: it’s a beautiful language, both intensely precise and rigorous, as well as poetically expressive and inviting. Spoken by millions in the ancient world and kept continuously “alive” up to the present, Latin provides a window onto an intellectual and cultural landscape that is both foreign and familiar to modern students. This beginning course will develop necessary vocabulary, forms, and grammar that allows students to begin reading short passages of unadulterated prose and poetry from the ancient Roman world right from the start.

    6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Rob Hardy
  • GRK 103: Greek Prose

    Selected prose readings. The course will emphasize review of grammar and include Greek composition. Prerequisites: Greek 102 with a grade of at least C-. 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Florencia Foxley
  • CLAS 122: The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory: From the Beginning to the Classical Age

    “Never say that prehistory is not history.” The late Fernand Braudel had it right. Over 99 percent of human history predates the written word, and this course examines one of the world’s most diverse, yet unifying environments–the Mediterranean Sea–from the earliest populations around its shores to the emergence of the Classical world of the Greeks and Romans. Neanderthals and modern humans, the first artists and farmers, multiculturalism among Greeks, Phoenicians, Etruscans, and others… These are some of the topics to be covered as we study the precursors and roots of what would become “Western” civilization. 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2021 · Alex Knodell
  • LATN 204: Intermediate Latin Prose and Poetry

    What are the “rules” of friendship? Would you do anything for a friend? Anything? The ancient Romans were no strangers to the often paradoxical demands of friendship and love. The goal for Intermediate Latin Prose and Poetry is to gain experience in the three major modes of Latin expression most often encountered “in the wild”—prose, poetry, and inscriptions—while exploring the notion of friendship. By combining all three modes into this one course, we hope both to create a suitable closure to the language sequence and to provide a reasonable foundation for further exploration of Roman literature and culture.

    Prerequisites: Latin 103 with a grade of at least C- or placement 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Chico Zimmerman
  • CLAS 229: Warlords and the Collapse of the Roman Republic

    The class will investigate the factors that led a Republican government that had lasted for 700 years to fall apart, leading to twenty years of civil war that only ended with the rise of a totalitarian dictatorship. We will look at the economic, social, military, and religious factors that played key roles in this dynamic political period. We will also trace the rise and influence of Roman warlords, politicians, and personalities and how they changed Roman politics and society. We will study many of the greatest characters in Roman history, as well as the lives of everyday Romans in this turbulent time.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2021 · Jordan Rogers
  • LATN 236: Plautus and Roman Comedy

    Mistaken identities, forbidden trysts, and a healthy dose of punny humor characterize many of the comedic plays of the Roman playwright Plautus. In this class, we will read the entirety of one of Plautus’ plays, Mostellaria (“The Haunted House”) in Latin, while reading selections from several other plays in English. Along the way, we will stop to consider the influence of Greek comedies on Plautus’, the importance of comedic performance to Roman society, the settings and venues of these performances, and the social status of comedic performers, all to come to a fuller understanding of Plautus’ language and plays.

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Fall 2021 · Jordan Rogers
  • GRK 285: Weekly Greek

    This course is intended for students who have completed Greek 204 (or equivalent) and wish to maintain and deepen their language skills. Students will meet weekly to review prepared passages, as well as reading at sight. Actual reading content will be determined prior to the start of term by the instructor in consultation with the students who have enrolled. There will be brief, periodic assessments of language comprehension throughout the term. 

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent 2 credits; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022 · Chico Zimmerman, Clara Hardy
  • CLAS 385: Islands in Time: Insular Life, Culture, and History in the Mediterranean World

    The Mediterranean is a world of islands, par excellence. This is particularly true of the classical world, when island polities, sanctuaries, and destinations played crucial roles in several aspects of social life and cultural production. This seminar examines what’s special about islands and why and how they came to be places of such significance in the ancient Mediterranean. We will begin with some consideration of our sources and theories of insularity, then move into thematic and conceptual discussions of island biogeography and efflorescence; islands in myth and as political and religious spaces; and islands as strategic territories and connective nodes. Topics in the second part of the class will to a large extent be driven by student interests.

    Prerequisites: At least two previous Classics courses or instructor consent 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2021 · Alex Knodell

Winter 2022

  • GRK 101: Elementary Greek

    From the triceratops (“three-horned-face”) to the antarctic (“opposite-the-bear-constellation”), ancient Greek has left traces in our language, literature (epic, tragedy, comedy), ways of organizing knowledge (philosophy, history, physics), and society (democracy, oligarchy, autocracy). It gives access to original texts from ancient Greece, early Christianity, and the Byzantine Empire, not to mention modern scientific terminology. In Greek 101 students will develop knowledge of basic vocabulary and grammar, and will begin reading short passages of prose and poetry. The class will meet five days a week.

    6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Jordan Rogers
  • LATN 102: Intermediate Latin

    Continuation of essential forms and grammar. Prerequisites: Latin 101 with a grade of at least C- or placement 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Chico Zimmerman
  • CLAS 117: From Stage to Screen: Adapting Greek Tragedy

    The terms “reboot,” “retelling,” and “adaptation” are all over TV and film. While some adaptations are praised for their creativity with the source material, others are panned. So what makes an adaptation good or bad? In this class, we will approach this question through Greek tragedy. We will read plays such as Oedipus Tyrannus, Antigone, Medea, and the Oresteia in translation alongside films from around the world in order to understand how directors and writers relate these ancient works to their own settings and struggles, decade after decade.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Winter 2022 · Florencia Foxley
  • CLAS 124: Roman Archaeology and Art

    The material worlds of the ancient Romans loom large in our cultural imagination. No other civilization has made as direct a contribution to our own political system or to its physical vestiges of power and authority. From the architecture of the state to visual narratives of propaganda, Roman influence is ubiquitous in the monuments of western civilization. But what were the origins of the Romans? Their innovations? Their technical, artistic, and ideological achievements? How are they relevant today? This course explores these questions and more through the archaeology of the eternal city and beyond.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2022 · Alex Knodell
  • GRK 204: Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry

    The goal for Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry is to gain experience in the three major modes of Greek expression most often encountered “in the wild”—prose, poetry, and inscriptions—while exploring the notion of happiness and the good life. By combining all three modes into this one course, we hope both to create a suitable closure to the language sequence and to provide a reasonable foundation for further exploration of Greek literature and culture.

    Prerequisites: Greek 103 with a grade of at least C- 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Jordan Rogers
  • LATN 243: Medieval Latin

    This course offers students an introduction to post-classical Latin (250-1450) through readings in prose and poetry drawn from a variety of genres and periods. Students will also gain experience with medieval Latin paleography and codicology through occasional workshops in Special Collections.

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent, Latin placement exam or instructor’s permission 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Winter 2022 · William North
  • GRK 285: Weekly Greek

    This course is intended for students who have completed Greek 204 (or equivalent) and wish to maintain and deepen their language skills. Students will meet weekly to review prepared passages, as well as reading at sight. Actual reading content will be determined prior to the start of term by the instructor in consultation with the students who have enrolled. There will be brief, periodic assessments of language comprehension throughout the term. 

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent 2 credits; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021, Winter 2022 · Chico Zimmerman, Clara Hardy
  • CLAS 400: Senior Research Project

    From topics developed in Classics 384, 385, 386, or 387, departmental majors will expand and refine their research into articles to be submitted to a journal of professional style, accepted and edited by the group into a presentable volume.

    Prerequisites: Classics 384, Classics 385, Classics 386 or Classics 387 3 credits; S/NC; offered Winter 2022 · Chico Zimmerman

Spring 2022

  • GRK 102: Intermediate Greek

    Study of essential forms and grammar, with reading of original, unadapted passages. Prerequisites: Greek 101 with a grade of at least C- 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Rob Hardy
  • LATN 103: Introduction to Latin Prose and Poetry

    This course completes the formal textbook introduction to the morphology and syntax of Latin. The focus will be on consolidating and applying grammatical concepts learned throughout the Latin sequence to the reading of extended selections of authentic Roman prose and poetry.

    Prerequisites: Latin 102 with a grade of at least C- or placement 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Jordan Rogers
  • CLAS 112: The Epic in Classical Antiquity: Texts, Contexts, and Intertexts

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance of the early Greek epics for the classical world and the western literary tradition that emerged from that world. This course will study closely both the Iliad and the Odyssey, as well as Hesiod’s Theogony, and then consider a range of works that draw upon these epics for their creator’s own purposes, including Virgil’s own epic, the Aeneid. By exploring the reception and influence of ancient epic, we will develop an appreciation for intertextuality and the dynamics of reading in general as it applies to generations of readers, including our own.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Chico Zimmerman
  • GRK 225: Creating Family in Ancient Athens

    What is a family and why does it matter? How is it created and who defines it? In this class we will read selections from a range of Greek literature—in the original and in translation—to determine our own answers to these questions.  Texts such as the Theogony, Sophocles’ Antigone, and Euripides’ Andromache, Xenophon’s Oeconomicus, and Aristotle’s Politics will guide us in our exploration of the political and personal motivations behind the way Athens defined and regulated families.

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Florencia Foxley
  • CLAS 227: Athens, Sparta, Persia and the Battle for Greece

    Forged in the crucible of wars fought between cultures with diametrically opposed views on politics and society, the fifth century BC witnessed arts, philosophy, and science all flourish in thrilling new ways. The two radically different Greek states of Athens and Sparta first teamed up to defeat the invading Persian empire. While this shocking victory spurred their respective cultures to new heights, their political aspirations drove them to turn on each other and fight a series of wars over control of Greece–all the while with Persia waiting in the wings. We will study these events against the backdrop of the political, intellectual, and cultural achievements of Athens, Sparta and Persia, drawing on the rich body of literature and material culture from this period.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2022 · Jordan Rogers
  • LATN 285: Weekly Latin

    This course is intended for students who have completed Latin 204 (or equivalent) and wish to maintain and deepen their language skills. Students will meet weekly to review prepared passages, as well as reading at sight. Actual reading content will be determined prior to the start of term by the instructor in consultation with the students who have enrolled. There will be brief, periodic assessments of language comprehension throughout the term. 

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent 2 credits; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Chico Zimmerman