• CLAS 100: The Trojan Legend: Mythology, Archaeology, and Legacy

    The rage of Achilles, the face that launched a thousand ships, Greeks bearing gifts, Brad Pitt’s leg double…The Trojan Legend is one of the most reproduced, adapted, and controversial stories of all time. Troy’s roots at the foundations of western literature have inspired countless works of art, literature, and film, which for millennia have retold this epic set of tales. In this seminar we will explore the legend of the Trojan War through ancient and modern literature and art, as well as the archaeological sites, civilizations, and imaginary places that have contributed to this legend down to the present.

    6 credits; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2019 · Alex Knodell
  • GRK 101: Elementary Greek

    From the triceratops (“three-horned-face”) to the antarctic (“opposite-the-bear-constellation”), ancient Greek has left traces in our language, literature (epic, tragedy, comedy), ways of organizing knowledge (philosophy, history, physics), and society (democracy, oligarchy, autocracy). It gives access to original texts from ancient Greece, early Christianity, and the Byzantine Empire, not to mention modern scientific terminology. In Greek 101 students will develop knowledge of basic vocabulary and grammar, and will begin reading short passages of prose and poetry. The class will meet five days a week.

    6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2020 · Alex Knodell
  • LATN 101: Elementary Latin

    While many claims are made about the benefits of learning Latin, here’s what we know for sure: it’s a beautiful language, both intensely precise and rigorous, as well as poetically expressive and inviting. Spoken by millions in the ancient world and kept continuously “alive” up to the present, Latin provides a window onto an intellectual and cultural landscape that is both foreign and familiar to modern students. This beginning course will develop necessary vocabulary, forms, and grammar that allows students to begin reading short passages of unadulterated prose and poetry from the ancient Roman world right from the start.

    6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2019 · Jake Morton
  • GRK 102: Intermediate Greek

    Study of essential forms and grammar, with reading of original, unadapted passages. Prerequisites: Greek 101 with a grade of at least C- 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2020 · Clara Hardy
  • LATN 102: Intermediate Latin

    Continuation of essential forms and grammar. Prerequisites: Latin 101 with a grade of at least C- or placement 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2020 · Chico Zimmerman
  • GRK 103: Greek Prose

    Selected prose readings. The course will emphasize review of grammar and include Greek composition. Prerequisites: Greek 102 with a grade of at least C-. 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2019 · Alex Knodell
  • LATN 103: Introduction to Latin Prose and Poetry

    This course completes the formal textbook introduction to the morphology and syntax of Latin. The focus will be on consolidating and applying grammatical concepts learned throughout the Latin sequence to the reading of extended selections of authentic Roman prose and poetry.

    Prerequisites: Latin 102 with a grade of at least C- or placement 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2020 · Jake Morton
  • CLAS 111: Classical Mythology

    Myth was an integral component of thought, both individual and societal, in the ancient cultures of Greece and Rome. We will study a selection of the most famous Classical myths through close reading of Homer, the Greek tragedians, Ovid and other ancient sources. In addition we’ll discuss the most prominent of modern modes of myth interpretation, in an attempt to determine how myth speaks–both to the ancient world and to us. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 112: The Epic in Classical Antiquity: Texts, Contexts, and Intertexts

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance of the early Greek epics for the classical world and the western literary tradition that emerged from that world. This course will study closely both the Iliad and the Odyssey, as well as Hesiod’s Theogony, and then consider a range of works that draw upon these epics for their creator’s own purposes, including Virgil’s own epic, the Aeneid. By exploring the reception and influence of ancient epic, we will develop an appreciation for intertextuality and the dynamics of reading in general as it applies to generations of readers, including our own.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2020 · Chico Zimmerman
  • CLAS 116: Ancient Drama: Truth in Performance

    The tragic and comic stage offered the Greeks and Romans a public arena for exploring fundamental questions about politics, divinity, sex, and death. Although written texts have preserved many ancient plays, the ideal vehicles for their communication remain, as their authors intended, the stage, the voice, and the body. This course will therefore introduce a variety of ancient tragedies and comedies with special attention, not only to their themes, but to the manner of their performance, culminating in student-driven productions that put into practice skills and expertise developed in the class. We will also experience modern adaptations of ancient drama, both in film and in the Twin Cities theater scene.

    6 credits; Arts Practice, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 122: The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory: From the Beginning to the Classical Age

    “Never say that prehistory is not history.” The late Fernand Braudel had it right. Over 99 percent of human history predates the written word, and this course examines one of the world’s most diverse, yet unifying environments–the Mediterranean Sea–from the earliest populations around its shores to the emergence of the Classical world of the Greeks and Romans. Neanderthals and modern humans, the first artists and farmers, multiculturalism among Greeks, Phoenicians, Etruscans, and others… These are some of the topics to be covered as we study the precursors and roots of what would become “Western” civilization. 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 123: Greek Archaeology and Art

    This course explores the archaeology and art of the Ancient Greek world. Beginning with prehistory, we will track the development of the material culture of Ancient Greece through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and conclude by discussing aspects of the Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman empires that followed. We will focus throughout on aspects of archaeological practice, material culture and text, art and society, long-term social change, and the role of the past in the present.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 124: Roman Archaeology and Art

    The material worlds of the ancient Romans loom large in our cultural imagination. No other civilization has made as direct a contribution to our own political system or to its physical vestiges of power and authority. From the architecture of the state to visual narratives of propaganda, Roman influence is ubiquitous in the monuments of western civilization. But what were the origins of the Romans? Their innovations? Their technical, artistic, and ideological achievements? How are they relevant today? This course explores these questions and more through the archaeology of the eternal city and beyond.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2020 · Alex Knodell
  • CLAS 127: Ancient Technology

    Technology–humanity’s efforts to manipulate its physical environment–stands as a central concern of the modern world. This course examines the technology of the ancient world and investigates its integral relationship to other facets of human activity. Theories of technological change will be explored initially in order to develop a socially-informed understanding of technology. In the second part, students will investigate specific ancient technologies using archaeological and textual evidence and present their findings to the class. The goal of this course is to understand technology as a social phenomenon in both the ancient and modern worlds. 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 131: Imagining New Worlds: From Homer to Columbus and Beyond

    From the beginnings of their civilization, the Greeks were aware that they inhabited just a small corner of a much larger world. How did they imagine faraway places and peoples? What did ancient maps look like? How much have Greek literature and science shaped later geographical thought and practice, from the Roman Empire to the European “Age of Exploration” to our own “Age of Google”? Can we use ancient methods to measure the world? Drawing on various sources in translation, we will explore the literary and scientific frontiers of ancient geography and trace its legacy into the modern world.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 135: Food and Drink in the Ancient World

    We may all be what we eat, but we are also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat. In this class, we will explore patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, examining issues like gender, health, and wealth within the historic and geographic context of the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds. Literary, art historical, anthropological and archaeological approaches and evidence will be explored in our pursuit of connections between food, drink, and daily life, as we consider how in both the ancient and modern worlds, we ‘are what we eat.’ 

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 145: Ancient Greek Religion

    Greek religion played a crucial role in how the ancient Greeks understood the world around them. Mythology and cosmology shaped their understanding of how the world worked, while the ritual of sacrifice formed the basis of the social fabric underpinning all aspects of Greek society.  In this course we will learn about Greece’s polytheistic belief system–its gods and religious rites–as well as examining how religion shaped the daily lives of ordinary Greeks, often in surprising ways. We will read the works of ancient authors such as Homer and Hesiod, study the archaeological remains of sacred sites, inscriptions, and curse tablets, as well as engage with experimental archaeology.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 173: Sport and Daily Life

    This course is an exploration of life, death, and entertainment in the ancient world, particularly in Rome. We will focus especially on how and why people take part in sporting events and on how sport intersected with gender, social class, and economic concerns in the ancient world. Topics include the history of sport, slavery and marginal groups, demography, gladiatorial and combat events, and entertainment and politics. Our primary focus in lecture and discussion will be interpretation of a variety of ancient sources, but we will also evaluate modern views of ancient entertainment. 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • GRK 204: Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry

    The goal for Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry is to gain experience in the three major modes of Greek expression most often encountered “in the wild”—prose, poetry, and inscriptions—while exploring the notion of happiness and the good life. By combining all three modes into this one course, we hope both to create a suitable closure to the language sequence and to provide a reasonable foundation for further exploration of Greek literature and culture.

    Prerequisites: Greek 103 with a grade of at least C- 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2020 · Clara Hardy
  • LATN 204: Intermediate Latin Prose and Poetry

    What are the “rules” of friendship? Would you do anything for a friend? Anything? The ancient Romans were no strangers to the often paradoxical demands of friendship and love. The goal for Intermediate Latin Prose and Poetry is to gain experience in the three major modes of Latin expression most often encountered “in the wild”—prose, poetry, and inscriptions—while exploring the notion of friendship. By combining all three modes into this one course, we hope both to create a suitable closure to the language sequence and to provide a reasonable foundation for further exploration of Roman literature and culture.

    Prerequisites: Latin 103 with a grade of at least C- or placement 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2019 · Chico Zimmerman
  • CLAS 214: Gender and Sexuality in Classical Antiquity

    In both ancient Greece and Rome, gender (along with class and citizenship status) largely determined what people did, where they spent their time, and how they related to others. This course will examine the ways in which Greek and Roman societies defined gender categories, and how they used them to think about larger social, political, and religious issues. Primary readings from Greek and Roman epic, lyric, and drama, as well as ancient historical, philosophical, and medical writers; in addition we will explore a range of secondary work on the topic from the perspectives of Classics and Gender Studies.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2020 · Clara Hardy
  • CLAS 223: Ancient Science

    Did the Greeks invent “science” as we know it, or has modern science blossomed into something wholly different from its ancient roots? How distinct are scientific and religious patterns of thinking? Who controls knowledge about nature, the cosmos, and the body, and what’s the proper way to communicate it? Why should we trust “the experts,” ancient or modern, anyway? Pursuing these and other questions, this course introduces students to the strange and dynamic world of ancient science, from the earliest Presocratics to Roman-era authorities like Claudius Ptolemy. Students will not only learn about theories that dominated Western thinking for millennia, but also gain first-hand experience with ancient scientific methods.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 227: Athens, Sparta, Persia and the Battle for Greece

    Forged in the crucible of wars fought between cultures with diametrically opposed views on politics and society, the fifth century BC witnessed arts, philosophy, and science all flourish in thrilling new ways. The two radically different Greek states of Athens and Sparta first teamed up to defeat the invading Persian empire. While this shocking victory spurred their respective cultures to new heights, their political aspirations drove them to turn on each other and fight a series of wars over control of Greece–all the while with Persia waiting in the wings. We will study these events against the backdrop of the political, intellectual, and cultural achievements of Athens, Sparta and Persia, drawing on the rich body of literature and material culture from this period.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 229: Warlords and the Collapse of the Roman Republic

    The class will investigate the factors that led a Republican government that had lasted for 700 years to fall apart, leading to twenty years of civil war that only ended with the rise of a totalitarian dictatorship. We will look at the economic, social, military, and religious factors that played key roles in this dynamic political period. We will also trace the rise and influence of Roman warlords, politicians, and personalities and how they changed Roman politics and society. We will study many of the greatest characters in Roman history, as well as the lives of everyday Romans in this turbulent time.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2019 · Jake Morton
  • CLAS 230: The Rise and Fall of the Great Hellenistic Kingdoms

    Alexander the Great united the Greek states by force before waging a ten-year campaign that brought Greek influence all the way to India. In the aftermath of Alexander’s death, his generals divided the world into kingdoms. These kingdoms presided over an extraordinary flourishing of arts and science over the next 300 years. However, this period also saw these kingdoms continuously strive for domination over one another until they were ultimately dominated by the rising power of Rome. This class will explore one of the most exciting periods in ancient history, a time of great cultural achievements, larger than life characters, and devastating conflicts.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2020 · Jake Morton
  • GRK 231: Homer: The Iliad

    Homer is perhaps the foundational poet of the western canon, and his work has been justly admired since its emergence out of the oral tradition of bardic recitation in the eighth century BCE. This course will sample key events and passages from the Iliad, exploring the fascinating linguistic and metrical features of the epic dialect, as well as the major thematic elements of this timeless story of conflict and reconciliation during the war at Troy. 

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Spring 2020 · Chico Zimmerman
  • CLAS 231: The Roman Principate

    This class introduces the history of Rome from Augustus to Diocletian. From demented emperors to new religions to economic collapse, the course uses Rome as a lens to address enduring historical questions. For example, how do individuals get, keep, and hand on power? What are the relationships between a central power and those on the periphery of that power and between a ruling elite and those they rule? How do foreign affairs affect internal policies and politics? Since we rely largely on ancient sources, we will also devote time to the interpretation of those sources in all their delightful eccentricity.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • LATN 233: The Catilinarian Conspiracy

    In 63 BC, a frustrated Roman nobleman named Catiline attempted to start a revolution to overthrow the Roman government, only to be exposed and stopped by the politician Cicero. At least, that is how Cicero depicts it, and we will read part of Cicero’s speech that led to Catiline’s condemnation. However, we will also read the contemporary Roman historian Sallust’s magisterial account of the events which reveals a more complicated story about both Catiline and the senators’ response. These are two of the greatest works in Latin literature and reading them together will allow us to investigate what really happened in 63 BC.

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2020 · Jake Morton
  • LATN 235: The Bacchanalian Affair

    In 186 BC stories of wild and debauched secret religious rites being celebrated under cover of night sparked panic in Rome, which led to a brutal state suppression of the cult. Was this a crackdown on impious behavior or political oppression? Over the course of the term we will translate three sources of evidence to determine what actually happened: the Roman historian Livy’s scintillating and outrageous account of this conspiracy; works by the Roman comedic playwright Plautus that might have shaped Livy’s storytelling; and the Senatus Consultum de Bacchanalibus, a detailed inscription found in southern Italy discussing the new laws Rome passed to suppress the cult.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 240: Rome: From Village to Superpower

    This class will investigate how Rome rose from a humble village of outcasts and refugees to become the preeminent power in the entire Mediterranean. We will trace Rome’s political evolution from kings to the Republic, alongside their gradual takeover of the Italian peninsula. We will study how Rome then swiftly overpowered what had been the most powerful kingdoms in the Mediterranean and established themselves as dominant. Who were these Romans and what were their political, military, religious, and social systems that enabled them to accomplish so much? What critical events shaped their development and ultimately led to total political control of the Mediterranean world? Students who previously took Classics 228 cannot take Classics 240.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • LATN 243: Medieval Latin

    This course offers students an introduction to post-classical Latin (250-1450) through readings in prose and poetry drawn from a variety of genres and periods. Students will also gain experience with medieval Latin paleography and codicology through occasional workshops in Special Collections.

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent, Latin placement exam or instructor’s permission 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • GRK 244: Plato Symposium

    Readings of some of the most significant dialogues in translation, with selections in the original. Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • GRK 245: Herodotus’s Histories

    In this course we will read and examine selections from Herodotus’s Histories in Greek, as well as the whole of the work in English. We will explore questions about historiography, culture, ethnicity, ancient warfare, contact between Greece and Persia, among other issues.

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 or the equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • LATN 255: Tacitus

    A survey of the works of the Roman Silver Age historian and rhetorician Gaius Cornelius Tacitus, reading Latin excerpts and selections in English translation. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2019–2020
  • LATN 256: The Art and Philosophy of the Letter

    Dear Carl, What Latin class are you taking this fall? Have you considered The Art and Philosophy of the Letter? The course will investigate why epistolary form was so important in Latin literature, and you’ll learn about the consequences (even controversies!) that resulted when authors imparted the form of personalized communication to texts with a public reception. We’ll read Cicero, Ovid, and Seneca, but also the correspondence of private individuals and some theoretical treatments of letter-writing, all to determine the range of styles and content that epistolary form enveloped. See you in September, Hans.

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • LATN 257: Caesar, Lucan, and Civil War

    This course will examine narratives of the early stages of the Roman Civil War through contemporary prose accounts of Caesar and Cicero and the poet Lucan’s Neronian epic on the Civil War. Topics will include manipulation of public opinion and memory, historical reconstruction through text, the relationship between prose history and historical epic, and the literal and metaphorical dissolution of Rome through civil war, as well as stylistic and philosophical concerns specific to each author. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • LATN 259: Seminar: Vergil

    Intensive study of selections from Vergil. May be offered simultaneously with Latin 359 without the supplemental assignments for advanced students. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Fall 2019 · Clara Hardy
  • CLAS 267: Political Landscapes: Archaeologies of Territory and Polity

    We live in a world of states. Nearly every inch of the earth is clearly delineated on maps and plans, ascribed to a particular political authority. But the widespread availability of precise spatial information is relatively new in human history. This seminar examines archaeology beyond the site. How did ancient polities understand and demarcate territory? What tools can we use to understand this? We begin by examining theories of space, place, landscape, and boundaries. The second part of the course compares case studies from across the ancient world to explore archaeological approaches to territory and polity in greater detail.

    Prerequisites: At least one previous archaeology course, Classics 122, 123, 124 or Archeology 246; contact instructor to discuss other relevant courses. 6 credits; Social Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • GRK 285: Weekly Greek

    This course is intended for students who have completed Greek 204 (or equivalent) and wish to maintain and deepen their language skills. Students will meet weekly to review prepared passages, as well as reading at sight. Actual reading content will be determined prior to the start of term by the instructor in consultation with the students who have enrolled. There will be brief, periodic assessments of language comprehension throughout the term. 

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent 2 credits; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2019, Winter 2020 · Clara Hardy
  • LATN 285: Weekly Latin

    This course is intended for students who have completed Latin 204 (or equivalent) and wish to maintain and deepen their language skills. Students will meet weekly to review prepared passages, as well as reading at sight. Actual reading content will be determined prior to the start of term by the instructor in consultation with the students who have enrolled. There will be brief, periodic assessments of language comprehension throughout the term. 

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent 2 credits; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2020 · Chico Zimmerman
  • CLAS 295: Junior Colloquium

    The Colloquium is designed to introduce and consolidate the research and interpretive skills required in the highly interdisciplinary study of Classical antiquity. Meeting weekly, three two-week modules will be organized around the main areas identified in the Classics major requirements—historical analysis, literary analysis, archaeological analysis—in order to solidify skills in finding, reading/interpreting, and citing evidence and sources from, and about, the Classical world. Additionally, students will choose a Symposium theme for the following year and generate a common bibliography pertaining to the topic of the Symposium. Students will also draft a Call for Papers and identify potential Symposium respondents.

    3 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2020
  • GRK 304: Greek Tragedy for Advanced Students

    Intensive study of one play in the original and the remaining plays in translation.

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • GRK 320: Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns

    Hesiod is the first Greek author to express an individual persona. He was a man from Askra — “harsh in winter, hard in summer, never pleasant” — yet at the same time he refers to nearby Mt. Helikon as the beautiful home of the muses who inspire his songs. His is a world of contrasts. This course will study (in Greek) Hesiod’s Theogony and Works and Days, which range widely in subject matter and message: the former describing the cosmic origins of the world; the latter a lesson in living the good life. We will also read some contemporary poetry.

    Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • GRK 351: Aristophanes

    Intensive study of one or two plays in the original and of the remaining plays in translation. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2019–2020
  • LATN 360: Catullus and Horace: Poetry, Pleasure and Politics

    From the volatile background of civil war and the early years of Augustus’ reign, we have two sets of Latin carmina: the vivid and passionate lyric poetry of Catullus, and Horace’s quieter but equally moving odes. This course will investigate the poetic techniques of each as we consider the larger question of how a poet responds to the shifting political forces of his world. We will also sample current scholarship on each poet.

    Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2019–2020
  • CLAS 394: Senior Seminar

    As part of their senior capstone experience, majors in the classics department will formulate a call for papers developing the current year’s theme for a colloquium, and following standard guidelines of the field produce proposals (“abstracts”) for their own papers to be presented in the winter term. 3 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2019
  • CLAS 400: Senior Symposium

    From proposals (“abstracts”) developed in Classics 394, departmental majors will compose a twenty minute presentation to be delivered at a symposium on the model of professional conferences. The talks will then be revised into articles to be submitted to a journal of professional style, accepted and edited by the group into a presentable volume.

    Prerequisites: Classics 394 3 credits; S/NC; offered Winter 2020