Fall 2022

  • CAMS 100: Rock ‘n’ Roll in Cinema

    This course is designed to explore the intersection between rock music and cinema. Taking a historical view of the evolution of the “rock film,” this class examines the impact of rock music on the structural and formal aspects of narrative, documentary, and experimental films and videos. The scope of the class will run from the earliest rock films of the mid-1950s through contemporary examples in ten weekly subunits.

    6 credits; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Jay Beck
  • CAMS 110: Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies

    This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2022, Spring 2023 · Jay Beck, Carol Donelan
  • CAMS 111: Digital Foundations

    This class introduces students to the full range of production tools and forms, building both the technical and conceptual skills needed to continue at more advanced levels. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, the role of sound and how to record and mix it, field and studio production, lighting, and editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Course work will include individual and group production projects, readings, and writing. This is an essential foundation for anyone interested in moving-image production and learning the specifics of CAMS’ studios, cameras, and lighting equipment.

    6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023 · Laska Jimsen, Catherine Licata, Cecilia Cornejo
  • CAMS 177: Television Studio Production

    In this hands-on studio television production course, students learn professional studio methods and techniques for creating both fiction and nonfiction television programs. Concepts include lighting and set design, blocking actors, directing cameras, composition, switching, sound recording and scripting. Students work in teams to produce four assignments, crewing for each other’s productions in front of and behind the camera, in the control room, and in post-production.

    6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022, Winter 2023 · Alexa Feeney
  • CAMS 186: Film Genres

    In this course we survey four or more Hollywood film genres, including but not limited to the Western, musical, horror film, comedy, and science-fiction film. What criteria are used to place a film in a particular genre? What role do audiences and studios play in the creation and definition of film genres? Where do genres come from? How do genres change over time? What roles do genres play in the viewing experience? What are hybrid genres and subgenres? What can genres teach us about society? Assignments aim to develop skills in critical analysis, research and writing.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2022 · Carol Donelan
  • CAMS 211: Film History II

    This course charts the continued rise and development of cinema 1948-1968, focusing on monuments of world cinema and their industrial, cultural, aesthetic and political contexts. Topics include postwar Hollywood, melodrama, authorship, film style, labor strikes, runaway production, censorship, communist paranoia and the blacklist, film noir, Italian neorealism, widescreen aesthetics, the French New Wave, art cinema, Fellini, Bergman, the Polish School, the Czech New Wave, Japanese and Indian cinema, political filmmaking in the Third World, and the New Hollywood Cinema. Requirements include class attendance and participation, readings, evening film screenings, and various written assignments and exams. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Carol Donelan
  • CAMS 222: Collaborative Narrative Filmmaking

    Narrative films are the product of many specialized artists working in concert toward a shared artistic vision. In this course, students will explore the essential crew roles on narrative films and choose an area in which they would like to specialize during the making of a collaborative project. Through the term, we will move through film development, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution with each student taking on a specific role in a group project. The term culminates in the exhibition of films that were made over the previous 10 weeks.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 111 6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022 · Catherine Licata
  • CAMS 258: Feminist and Queer Media

    The focus of this course is on spectatorship—feminist, lesbian, queer, transgender. The seminar interrogates arguments about representation and the viewer’s relationship to the moving image in terms of identification, desire, masquerade, fantasy, power, time, and embodied experience. The course first explores the founding essays of psychoanalytic feminist film theory, putting these ideas into dialogue with mainstream cinema. Second, we consider the aesthetic, narrative, and theoretical interventions posed by feminist filmmakers working in contradistinction to Hollywood. Third, “queering” contemporary media, we survey challenges and revisions to feminist film theory presented by considerations of race and ethnicity, transgender experience, and queerness.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2022 · Candace Moore
  • CAMS 270: Nonfiction

    This course addresses nonfiction media as both art form and historical practice by exploring the expressive, rhetorical, and political possibilities of nonfiction production. A focus on relationships between form and content and between makers, subjects, and viewers will inform our approach. Throughout the course we will pay special attention to the ethical concerns that arise from making media about others’ lives. We will engage with diverse modes of nonfiction production including essayistic, experimental, and participatory forms and create community videos in partnership with Carleton’s Center for Community and Civic Engagement and local organizations. The class culminates in the production of a significant independent nonfiction media project.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 111 or instructor consent 6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022 · Laska Jimsen
  • CAMS 370: Advanced Production Workshop I

    In this course, students will develop a concept and complete pre-production for their CAMS production comps. Students will draw inspiration from a variety of sources that are personal, cultural, and observational, and in doing so, develop confidence in their own artistic practice and perspective. We will refine technical and formal strategies, consider audience reception, and practice giving and receiving constructive critique. Prior to registering for the course, students must submit a project proposal to the instructor. Final enrollment is based on the quality of the proposal. Note: This course is intended to prepare students for a Comps production project in winter term and it is the first in a two part sequence with CAMS 371. If you have any questions about enrolling in this course, please email the instructor.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 111, and either Cinema and Media Studies 270 or 271 or instructor consent 6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022 · Catherine Licata
  • CAMS 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credits; S/NC; offered Fall 2022, Winter 2023 · Catherine Licata

Winter 2023

  • CAMS 111: Digital Foundations

    This class introduces students to the full range of production tools and forms, building both the technical and conceptual skills needed to continue at more advanced levels. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, the role of sound and how to record and mix it, field and studio production, lighting, and editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Course work will include individual and group production projects, readings, and writing. This is an essential foundation for anyone interested in moving-image production and learning the specifics of CAMS’ studios, cameras, and lighting equipment.

    6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023 · Laska Jimsen, Catherine Licata, Cecilia Cornejo
  • CAMS 177: Television Studio Production

    In this hands-on studio television production course, students learn professional studio methods and techniques for creating both fiction and nonfiction television programs. Concepts include lighting and set design, blocking actors, directing cameras, composition, switching, sound recording and scripting. Students work in teams to produce four assignments, crewing for each other’s productions in front of and behind the camera, in the control room, and in post-production.

    6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022, Winter 2023 · Alexa Feeney
  • CAMS 214: Film History III

    This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2023 · Jay Beck
  • CAMS 225: Film Noir: The Dark Side of the American Dream

    After Americans grasped the enormity of the Depression and World War II, the glossy fantasies of 1930s cinema seemed hollow indeed. During the 1940s, the movies, our true national pastime, took a nosedive into pessimism. The result? A collection of exceptional films populated with tough guys and dangerous women lurking in the shadows of nasty urban landscapes. This course focuses on classic American noir as well as neo-noir from a variety of perspectives, including mode and genre, visual style and narrative structure, postwar culture and politics, and race, gender, and sexuality. Requirements include two screenings per week and several short papers.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2023 · Carol Donelan
  • CAMS 246: Documentary Studies

    This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2023 · Cecilia Cornejo
  • CAMS 265: Sound Design

    This course examines the theories and techniques of sound design for film and video. Students will learn the basics of audio recording, sound editing and multi-track sound design specifically for the moving image. The goal of the course is a greater understanding of the practices and concepts associated with soundtrack development through projects using recording equipment and the digital audio workstation for editing and mixing.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 111 or instructor permission 6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Winter 2023 · Jay Beck
  • CAMS 279: Screenwriting

    This course teaches students the fundamentals of screenwriting. Topics include understanding film structure, writing solid dialogue, creating dimensional characters, and establishing dramatic situations. Art, craft, theory, form, content, concept, genre, narrative strategies and storytelling tools are discussed. Students turn in weekly assignments, starting with short scenes and problems and then moving on to character work, synopses, outlines, pitches and more. The goal is for each student to write a 15 to 25 page script for a short film by the end of the term.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 110 or 111 or instructor permission 6 credits; Arts Practice, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2023 · Michael Elyanow
  • CAMS 340: Television Studies Seminar

    This seminar aims to develop students into savvy critical theorists of television, knowledgeable about the field, and capable of challenging previous scholarship to invent new paradigms. The first half of the course surveys texts foundational to television studies while the second half focuses primarily on television theory and criticism produced over the last two decades. Television Studies covers a spectrum of approaches to thinking and writing critically about television, including: semiotics; ideological critique; cultural studies; genre and narrative theories; audience studies; production studies; and scholarship positioning post-network television within the contexts of media convergence and digital media. 

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 110 or instructor permission 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Winter 2023 · Candace Moore
  • CAMS 371: Advanced Production Workshop II

    Advanced Production Workshop II is taken in conjunction with CAMS 400 for students completing production comps. Production projects are inherently collaborative; this course supports collaboration through workshops, crewing, and informed critique. This course is the second in the advanced production workshop sequence with a focus on production and post-production. Please contact instructor for further information.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 370 or instructor consent 6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Winter 2023 · Laska Jimsen
  • CAMS 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credits; S/NC; offered Fall 2022, Winter 2023 · Catherine Licata

Spring 2023

  • CAMS 110: Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies

    This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2022, Spring 2023 · Jay Beck, Carol Donelan
  • CAMS 111: Digital Foundations

    This class introduces students to the full range of production tools and forms, building both the technical and conceptual skills needed to continue at more advanced levels. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, the role of sound and how to record and mix it, field and studio production, lighting, and editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Course work will include individual and group production projects, readings, and writing. This is an essential foundation for anyone interested in moving-image production and learning the specifics of CAMS’ studios, cameras, and lighting equipment.

    6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023 · Laska Jimsen, Catherine Licata, Cecilia Cornejo
  • CAMS 218: Contemporary Global Cinemas

    This course is designed as a critical study of global filmmakers and the issues surrounding cinema and its circulation in the twenty-first century. The class will emphasize the close reading of films to study different cultural discourses, cinematic styles, genres, and reception. It will look at national, transnational, and diasporic-exilic cinema to consider how films express both cultural forms and contexts. Aesthetic, social, political, and industrial issues also will be examined each week to provide different approaches for cinematic analysis.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2023 · Jay Beck
  • CAMS 271: Fiction

    Through a series of exercises, students will explore the fundamentals of making narrative films. Areas of focus in this course include visual storytelling and cinematography, working with actors, and story structure. Through readings, screenings, and writing exercises, we will analyze how mood, tone, and themes are constructed through formal techniques. Course work includes individual and group exercise, and culminates in individual short narrative projects.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 111 and one additional Cinema and Media Studies course, or instructor permission 6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Spring 2023 · Catherine Licata
  • CAMS 280: Advanced Screenwriting

    Topic: Advanced Writing for Television. This is an intensive writing practicum for motivated students to complete a well-structured original television pilot. The course will explore dramatic structure, character motivation and action, and the complex interplay between plot and character. Students will refine their tools for television writing as they develop and revise their pilot’s logline, tone, stakes, theme, and more. Over ten weeks students will move from concept to outline and then to a full draft of their original pilot. Weekly feedback provides students with an honest evaluation of their material in a dynamic and supportive environment.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 264, 278 or 279, or instructor consent 6 credits; Arts Practice, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2023
  • CAMS 288: Experimental Film & Video Production

    Experimental Film & Video Production is a process-based production course focused on the conceptual and technical concerns of experimental film, video and other time-based arts. We will explore the personal, cultural, political, and formal/aesthetic aspects of experimental media through readings, writings, screenings and the production of experimental media projects. Key course concerns include medium specificity and relationships between sound and image, form and content, and theory and practice. We will consider “experimental” as a working practice rather than a genre–a way of testing hypotheses and a process of discovery.

    Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 111 and one additional Cinema and Media Studies course or instructor permission 6 credits; Arts Practice; offered Spring 2023 · Laska Jimsen
  • CAMS 330: Cinema Studies Seminar

    The purpose of this seminar is guide students in developing and consolidating their conceptual understanding of theories central to the field of cinema studies. Emphasis is on close reading and discussion of classical and contemporary theories ranging from Eisenstein, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin and Barthes to theories of authorship, genre and ideology and trends in contemporary theory influenced by psychoanalysis, phenomenology and cognitive studies.

    Prerequisites: Cinema and Media Studies 110 or instructor permission 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Spring 2023 · Carol Donelan