• CHIN 101: Elementary Chinese

    Introduction to Chinese sentence structure and writing system, together with the development of basic aural/oral skills, with attention to the cultural context. Students who have learned spoken Mandarin Chinese at home or in another context, but who are unable to read or write, are encouraged to register for Chinese 280. 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Lei Yang
  • JAPN 101: Elementary Japanese

    Introduction to the Japanese sentence structure and writing system, together with the development of basic aural/oral skills, with attention to cultural context. 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Noboru Tomonari
  • CHIN 102: Elementary Chinese

    Continuation of Chinese 101. Prerequisites: Chinese 101 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Lin Deng
  • JAPN 102: Elementary Japanese

    Continuation of Japanese 101. Prerequisites: Japanese 101 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Chie Tokuyama
  • CHIN 103: Elementary Chinese

    Continuation of Chinese 101, 102. Prerequisites: Chinese 102 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Lin Deng
  • JAPN 103: Elementary Japanese

    Continuation of Japanese 102. Prerequisites: Japanese 102 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Chie Tokuyama
  • JAPN 105: Pilgrimage and Sacred Space in Japan Program: Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture through Language Study

    Students with no prior Japanese language study will enroll in this course. It is designed to introduce basic pattern and vocabulary with a special emphasis on topics related to everyday life in Japan and interactions with people. As part of this course, students are required to complete before Spring online assignments to learn to read the two forms of the Japanese phonetic script, hiragana and katakana.

    Prerequisites: Participation in OCS program 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • ASLN 111: Writing Systems

    The structure and function of writing systems, with emphasis on a comparison of East Asian writing systems (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) to Western alphabetic systems. Topics covered include classification of writing systems, historical development, diffusion and borrowing of writing systems, and comparison with non-writing symbol systems.

    6 credits; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2021 · Lin Deng
  • CHIN 204: Intermediate Chinese

    Expansion of vocabulary and learning of complex sentence forms, with equal emphasis on the development of the four skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension. Prerequisites: Chinese 103 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Lin Deng, Faye Merritt
  • JAPN 204: Intermediate Japanese

    Emphasis is on the development of reading skills, especially the mastery of kanji, with some work on spoken Japanese through the use of audiovisual materials.

    Prerequisites: Japanese 103 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2021 · Miaki Habuka
  • CHIN 205: Intermediate Chinese

    Continuation of Chinese 204. Completion of this course with a C- or better fulfills the language requirement.

    Prerequisites: Chinese 204, Chinese 280 or placement 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Faye Merritt
  • JAPN 205: Intermediate Japanese

    Continuation of Japanese 204. Completion of this course with a C- or better fulfills language requirement. Prerequisites: Japanese 204 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2022 · Miaki Habuka
  • CHIN 206: Chinese in Cultural Context

    This course advances students’ proficiency in oral and written Chinese, at the same time integrating elements of traditional Chinese civilization and modern Chinese society. Emphasis is on cultural understanding and appropriate language use. Prerequisites: Chinese 205 or equivalent 6 credits; offered Spring 2022 · Lin Deng
  • JAPN 206: Japanese in Cultural Context

    This course advances students’ proficiency in the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing in Japanese. The course also integrates elements of traditional Japanese civilization and modern Japanese society, emphasizing cultural understanding and situationally appropriate language use.

    Prerequisites: Japanese 205 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2022 · Miaki Habuka
  • JAPN 231: Tradition and Modernity: Japanese Cinema in Translation

    This course examines the extraordinary achievement of Japanese cinema, from the classic films of Mizoguchi, Ozu, and Kurosawa to the pop cinema of Kitano and the phenomenon of anime. The films will be studied for their aesthetic, cultural, and auteur contexts. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship of the film to traditional arts, culture and society. This course is conducted in English and all the course materials are in English translation or in English subtitles.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Spring 2022 · Noboru Tomonari
  • CHIN 239: Digital China: Media, Culture, and Society

    This course invites students to critically examine digital media technologies in relation to social change, cultural innovation, and popular entertainment. Drawing on literature from media, literary, and cultural studies, the course engages in topics such as new media institutions, Internet businesses, global activism, gender and sexuality, and mobile applications. Special attention is paid to the implications that digital media bring forth within particular social and historical contexts, as well as the ways in which the Internet serves as the site for the negotiation of various political, economic, and cultural forces. In translation.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 240: Chinese Cinema in Translation

    This course introduces to students the drastic transformation of Chinese society, culture, and politics over the past three decades through the camera lens. We will examine representative films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Particular attention will be paid to the entangled relationship between art, commerce, and politics, as well as the role digital technologies and international communities play in reshaping the contemporary cultural landscape in China. This class requires no prior knowledge of Chinese language, literature, or culture. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Spring 2022 · Shaohua Guo
  • JAPN 244: The World of Anime in Translation

    This course examines the extraordinary achievement of anime (Japanese animation), from the modern classics by Hayao Miyazaki, Isao Takahata, and Mamoru Oshii, to more recent anime directors. The anime will be studied for their aesthetic, cultural, and auteur contexts. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship of the anime to traditional arts, culture and society. This course is conducted in English and all the course materials are in English translation or in English subtitles.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 245: Chinese Vision of the Past in Translation

    China—the modern nation—never escapes the influence of the past. But why do Chinese literature and movies like discussing and presenting the past? Do these works truly reflect the past? How is the past presented? What techniques impact the narration of the past and the audience’s perceptions? Through comparison of historic texts and fictional retellings of the same stories, students will gain a better understanding of representation of the past and develop critical reading, analysis, discussion, and writing skills. Sources include historical narratives and biographies, classical texts, poems, fiction, and film. No knowledge of Chinese language required.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 245: Modern Japanese Literature and Manga in Translation

    This course is a study of major works of modern fiction in Japan and their recent adaptations in manga. We will pay particular attention to cultural, aesthetic, and ideological aspects of Japanese literature in the twentieth century and to the relationship between the text, the author, and the society. We will also read their adaptations in manga. Manga has become the most popular literary medium during the last century and we will consider the relationship between modern Japanese literature and manga. This class requires no prior knowledge of Japanese language, literature, manga, or culture.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 246: Monsters and Japan

    The monster always escapes and always returns. This course examines how the concept of monstrousness has manifested in Japan throughout the ages, taking different forms to reflect changing conditions. Surveying a broad range of media, including literature, theater, manga, and anime, we will compare chimeric expressions of otherness in Japanese culture. No Japanese language is required.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 247: Japanese Book Culture

    What is a book?  The answer—from a nineteenth century Japanese perspective—may surprise you. This course looks at how the Japanese woodblock-printed book is the site of colliding worlds of creative, political, social, and technological challenges. The course materials will be both in translation and physical access to real historical examples. As a hands-on approach, the class will design and publish its own woodblock-printed book.  No Japanese language is required.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 248: Modern Japanese Literature: A Survey on Modern Japanese Aesthetics

    This course offers an introduction to modern theories of art, with an emphasis on the origin of modern Japanese literature (1868-1945) and its newly cultivated aesthetic sensibilities. What are the defining characteristics of literature and what are its values in society? How is our aesthetic taste for beauty determined? The course surveys the field of modern Japanese literature, exploring the newly instituted notion of “literature” and the lofty role its pursuit of “beauty” played, as writers insisted, in enlightening the modern denizens living the age of uncertainty. Topics of inquires include how the shift in aesthetic taste for beauty correlated with the change in human relation to the natural world, and what moral implication it entailed. We explore answers to these questions by close-reading various cultural texts. Other readings will range historically and cross-culturally from premodern indigenous discourse on beauty to the nineteenth century Western aesthetic

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2021 · Chie Tokuyama
  • CHIN 250: Chinese Popular Culture in Translation

    This course (taught in English) provides an overview of Chinese popular culture from 1949 to the contemporary era, including popular literature, film, posters, music, and blog entries. The course examines both old and new forms of popular culture in relation to social change, cultural spaces, new media technologies, the state, individual expressions, and gender politics. Throughout this course, special attention is paid to the alliance between popular literature and the booming entertainment industry, the making of celebrity culture, and the role digital media plays in shaping China’s cultural landscape. The course requires no prior knowledge of Chinese language, literature, or culture.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 251: Heroes, Heroines, Exceptional Lives in Chinese Biographical Histories

    Through generic and historical analysis of the two-millennia long biographical tradition in Chinese historical writing, this project explores lives of heroes and heroines, including, but not limited to: dynastic founders, ministers, generals, poets, assassins, and exceptional women. In this introduction to premodern Chinese culture and literature, students will experience, in English translation, some of the most beautiful works of ancient Chinese literature from the second century BCE through the eighteenth century CE. No prior Chinese language study required.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2022 · Lei Yang
  • CHIN 252: The Chinese Language: A Linguistic and Cultural Survey

    This course offers a unique introduction to the Chinese language for anyone curious about its defining characteristics and how they shaped, impacted, or relate to certain social, political, and cultural practices and traditions in China, present and past. This course will prepare students with the knowledge to make informed judgment on common misconceptions or prejudices, by non-Chinese and Chinese speakers, concerning the Chinese language or its writing system. Students are expected to learn about some general linguistic concepts and notions in regard to structural features of human language and its relationship with mind, society, and culture through this course. No prior knowledge of Chinese or linguistics is required.

    6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 258: Classical Chinese Thought: Wisdom and Advice from Ancient Masters

    Behind the skyscrapers and the modern technology of present-day China stand the ancient Chinese philosophers, whose influence penetrates every aspect of society. This course introduces the teachings of various foundational thinkers: Confucius, Mencius, Laozi, Sunzi, Zhuangzi, and Hanfeizi, who flourished from the fifth-second centuries B.C. Topics include kinship, friendship, self-improvement, freedom, the art of war, and the relationship between human beings and nature. Aiming to bring Chinese wisdom to the context of daily life, this course opens up new possibilities to better understand the self and the world. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

    6 credits; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • ASLN 260: Historical Linguistics

    Concepts and techniques of historical linguistics, especially methods used in the discovery of family relationships between languages and the reconstruction of ancestral forms. Other topics include grammatical, semantic, and lexical change, processes of sound change, language contact, and the use of linguistic evidence in cultural reconstruction. In addition to the more familiar Indo-European languages, data will come from Western Pacific and Australian languages, and especially East Asian languages.

    Prerequisites: Previous experience in linguistics or instructor’s permission. 6 credits; Social Inquiry; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 280: Chinese Literacy

    This course is aimed at fluent Mandarin speakers who have not learned to read and write. Students will intensively study the same characters as taught in Chinese 101, 102, 103, and 204. Successful completion will allow students to register for Chinese 205 in the winter term.

    Prerequisites: Near-native fluency in oral Mandarin 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 342: Advanced Reading in Modern Japanese Manga

    Introduction to canonical authors in modern Japanese manga in the original with exposure to a variety of themes and styles. Some practice in critical analysis.

    Prerequisites: Japanese 206 or the equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Winter 2022 · Noboru Tomonari
  • JAPN 343: Advanced Japanese: Human-Nonhuman Relationship in Japanese Popular Media

    This course explores Japanese popular media from an environmental perspective. The course incorporates prose, live-action films, and animation produced from 1868 through the present and attends to political, cultural, and philosophical events that ran parallel to developments and changes in the human relationship with the non-human world. By close-reading cultural texts produced in different eras, we will explore what options were available for rebuilding a sustainable environment in modern and contemporary Japan. Themes of exploration include modernization, internal colonization, gender, and industrial disaster, while familiarizing ourselves with an array of canonical authors and issues of global relevance. Students will develop skills in comprehending diverse cultural materials and outputting their integrated knowledge through in-class discussion and written assignments.

    Prerequisites: Japanese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2021 · Chie Tokuyama
  • JAPN 345: Advanced Reading in Modern Japanese Literature: The Short Story

    Introduction to modern Japanese short fiction in the original, with exposure to a variety of styles. Some practice in critical analysis and literary translation. Prerequisites: Japanese 206 or the equivalent. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 347: Advanced Chinese: Reading the News

    This course uses internet readings of various Chinese language news sources to learn about multiple Chinese perspectives on current events, and to become conversant in the prose style that is a model for formal written Chinese. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, text comprehension strategies, and differences between colloquial and written usage. Active use of the language (including oral discussion and regular written compositions) will be stressed. Students will learn to become savvy, independent consumers of Chinese-language news media.

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 347: Advanced Reading in Contemporary Japanese Prose: Newspapers

    Introduction to journalistic prose styles, with attention to vocabulary and syntax peculiar to newspapers. Discussion in Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or the equivalent.

    6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 348: Advanced Chinese: The Mass Media

    This course introduces to students major milestones in the development of Chinese cinema since 1980, with additional materials including popular television shows and online materials. Emphasis will be on culturally appropriate language use, and on discussion of the social issues that are implicitly and explicitly addressed on the Chinese-language media. The course aims to increase students’ fluency in all four aspects of Chinese language learning (listening, speaking, reading, writing) and to deepen students’ understanding of China as a transitional society.

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Spring 2022 · Shaohua Guo
  • CHIN 349: Tasting China: Regional Geography and Food Culture

    This course creates a virtual journey that enriches students’ knowledge and understanding of Chinese food culture in geographical context through a range of textual and non-textual materials including essays by renowned writers and food critics, illustrated book chapters and magazine articles and reports, and acclaimed documentary films and videos. The course will familiarize students with culturally authentic and stylistically appropriate vocabulary and structures commonly found in cultural narratives, increase their ability to converse with extended discourse in topics relating to food culture, and enhance their comprehension and writing skills of literary and written Chinese.

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 350: Pilgrimage & Sacred Space in Japan Program: Advanced Japanese through Place-Based Learning in Kyoto

    We will explore various cultural, historical and social issues of Japan in Japanese. The course aims to improve students’ skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking through place-based learning. Many of the assignments focus on what students will experience in Kyoto during the OCS program–local topics in Kyoto as well as ongoing social issues in Japan at large. Improving their Japanese linguistic and cultural fluency, students will learn to respond creatively and respectfully to stories of the place and become a part of the community, rather than a passive observer of it.

    Prerequisites: Japanese 206 or equivalent. 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 351: Advanced Japanese through Documentary Film

    In this course we will subtitle in English a Japanese documentary film and also read the script and/or other related materials. The course aims to improve understanding of spoken Japanese at a natural pace, to improve the skill in reading of Japanese texts, and to comprehend some aspects of contemporary Japan. Students are expected to participate actively in the discussion of the film and the subtitles. Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or equivalent.

    6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 353: Thinking about Environmental Issues in Japanese

    This course explores various environmental issues, pollution, recycle, etc., in Japanese using newspaper clips, internet, and other authentic written texts. We will examine what kind of environmental issues Japan faces and how the government and communities are dealing with them. Then students are expected to explore how their communities are dealing with environmental issues. The purpose of the course is to encourage students to think about issues, contents, in Japanese rather than study purely language, grammar and vocabularies. Students are expected to write a short research paper in Japanese and do class presentation at the end. Prerequisites: Japanese 206 or equivalent. 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 355: Contemporary Chinese Short Stories

    This advanced Chinese language course focuses on contemporary short stories. The course is designed to help students enhance reading skills, expand students’ mastery of advanced vocabulary, and prepare students to analyze authentic materials. The historical, cultural, and literary forces that shape these cultural works also will be examined. Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 356: The Japanese Response to COVID-19: Japanese Language Sources

    How have the Japanese responded to COVID-19?  By looking at newspaper articles, news videos, blogs, poems, manga, and other visual and verbal media sources, we will understand how the Japanese peoples are understanding and coping with the dramatic shifts in society caused by the pandemic. Students are encouraged to use their own localized experiences as a starting point for discussing and researching the Japanese responses. 

    Prerequisites: Japanese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, International Studies; not offered 2021–2022
  • JAPN 357: Puppets, Dolls, Robots, and Vocaloids in Japanese Culture

    This course examines the representations and meanings of puppets, dolls, robots, and vocaloids in Japan from the seventeenth century until the twenty-first century. The Japanese developed their own strands of puppet cultures, starting in early modern Japan where the Japanese came to privilege puppets in the form of bunraku theater. Puppets functioned as a useful means for Japanese rhetoric and self-expression, and this has been the case especially in popular culture. We will watch films, videos, and read works of fiction and manga to interpret Japan through puppets and their recent equivalents. 

    Prerequisites: Japanese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 358: Advanced Chinese: Everyday Life in Ancient China

    Were chopsticks originally eating utensils? Did ancient Chinese sleep on beds and sit on chairs? What did they wear? In this course, students will find answers to questions like those in a series of expository writings concerning various aspects of daily life in ancient Chinese society, while enhancing their proficiency in comprehending authentic materials and producing extended discourse on related topics through a variety of oral and written coursework. This course also provides a fair amount of exposure to common sources for historical studies of China, and thus expands students’ vocabulary and knowledge about Chinese history and archaeology.

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2022 · Lin Deng
  • CHIN 360: Classical Chinese

    This course introduces to students the essentials of classical Chinese through a close reading of authentic materials. A wide range of genres, including prose, poems, idioms, and short stories, will be introduced to enrich students’ understanding of various writing conventions and styles. The historical, cultural, and literary forces that shape these cultural works also will be examined.

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent. 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 361: Advanced Chinese: Readings in Twentieth Century Literature

    Students will read, discuss, and write about major literary works from twentieth century China in order to both improve their language abilities and increase their understanding of the artistic and intellectual milieu in which the works were produced. Readings will include selections from modern and contemporary Chinese literature, including poetry, fiction, novels, and letters in the original Chinese. 

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 362: Advanced Chinese: Traditional Culture in Modern Language

    This course explores Chinese traditional culture in advanced Mandarin Chinese. The long history and rich culture in premodern China have produced a precious legacy that has been widely inherited by contemporary China and significantly impacted the modern society. To better understand present-day China and the Chinese language, it is crucial for advanced learners to track the evolution back while acquiring higher-level vocabulary and structures. Lesson topics center on literature, language, writing, and so on. Many of our texts are from ancient Chinese stories (Mencius, Brotherhood, Language of Flowers, Dream of Red Mansions, etc.)

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Fall 2021 · Lei Yang
  • CHIN 363: Conversation and Composition: The Liberal Arts in Chinese

    Carleton students receive a broad education, their ability to express themselves in Chinese should be equally broad. This course will provide instruction and practice in speaking, reading, and writing about fundamental concepts from natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and the arts. Students will learn to read and discuss the kind of non-specialist works that any well-educated speaker can comprehend, and will also receive a foundation that can lead to more specialized work. Specific topics to be covered will depend on the interests of students in the class. Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent. 6 credits; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2021–2022
  • CHIN 364: Chinese Classic Tales and Modern Adaptation

    This course introduces to students influential Chinese classic tales and their modern adaptation across media platforms. Students improve their listening and speaking skills through viewing and discussing visual materials. Students develop their reading and writing proficiencies through analyzing authentic texts, formulating their own arguments, and writing critical essays. The overarching goal of this course is to increase students’ fluency in all aspects of Chinese language learning and to deepen students’ understanding of the role that cultural tradition plays in shaping China’s present.

    Prerequisites: Chinese 206 or equivalent (students who have taken one 300-level course at Carleton are qualified to register) 6 credits; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2021–2022