Christina (Hasler) Jacobsen ’67

28 August 1988

Class: 1967

Major: History

Deceased: September 4, 1971

(Deceased 09/04/1971)

Tina and I both came from St. Louis, but she was from one of the wealthier suburbs and I lived in the central city.  She was tall and very elegant.  I was (and remain) fairly short. On the surface, we had very little in common.  But when we both became senior counselors on Third Nourse, I came to know her as the smart, funny, down- to-earth person she was.  We became fast friends and kept in touch, even after she married and moved off to Alaska.  When a mutual friend and classmate told me about the plane crash, I didn’t believe it.  I couldn’t believe that someone so vital and alive could be gone.  Her mother said she had been returning from a hunting trip with husband Jake, one of her brothers, and her sister-in-law when the plane went down.  So her last days had been happy and she was with people she loved and who loved her.

Magaret Simms ’67
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Tina Hasler and I met when we were both taking Philip Sheridan’s freshman composition class at Carleton (I think at Carleton they called it “Rhetoric”). After that class, we did not see each other that often, but when we did, we would talk about the classes we were taking and maybe a little about what was happening in the world . She would always smile at me and sometimes give me a little hug. I remember that when we were taking Carleton’s comprehensive exams in this big biology classroom, she gave me a smile and seemed to say, “David, we can do this.” She always treated me with respect and was never condescending to me. I think she made me a more self-confident person. I know that I did not know her all that well, but when I learned that she had died in a plane crash, I was devastated. I am so sad that she died so young. I liked her very, very much. David Mindock ’67

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  • 2016-09-26 11:28:11
    Margaret Simms

    Tina and I both came from St. Louis, but she was from one of the wealthier suburbs and I lived in the central city.  She was tall and very elegant.  I was (and remain) fairly short. On the surface, we had very little in common.  But when we both became senior counselors on Third Nourse, I came to know her as the smart, funny, down- to-earth person she was.  We became fast friends and kept in touch, even after she married and moved off to Alaska.  When a mutual friend and classmate told me about the plane crash, I didn't believe it.  I couldn't believe that someone so vital and alive could be gone.  Her mother said she had been returning from a hunting trip with husband Jake, one of her brothers, and her sister-in-law when the plane went down.  So her last days had been happy and she was with people she loved and who loved her. 

  • 2019-09-20 02:04:10
    David M Mindock

    Tina Hasler and I met when we were both taking Philip Sheridan's freshman composition class at Carleton (I think at Carleton they called it "Rhetoric"). After that class, we did not see each other that often, but when we did, we would talk about the classes we were taking and maybe a little about what was happening in the world . She would always smile at me and sometimes give me a little hug. I remember that when we were taking Carleton's comprehensive exams in this big biology classroom, she gave me a smile and seemed to say, "David, we can do this." She always treated me with respect and was never condescending to me. I think she made me a more self-confident person. I know that I did not know her all that well, but when I learned that she had died in a plane crash, I was devastated. I am so sad that she died so young. I liked her very, very much. David Mindock

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